Research Papers

Fluorescence microscopy imaging of electroperturbation in mammalian cells

[+] Author Affiliations
Yinghua Sun

University of Southern California, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Los Angeles, California

P. Thomas Vernier

University of Southern California, Department of Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics and MOSIS, Information Sciences Institute, Marina Del Rey, California

Matthew Behrend

University of Southern California, Department of Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics, Los Angeles, California

Jingjing Wang, Mya Mya Thu

University of Southern California, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Los Angeles, California

Martin Gundersen

University of Southern California, Department of Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Los Angeles, California

Laura Marcu

University of California Davis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Davis, California

J. Biomed. Opt. 11(2), 024010 (March 27, 2006). doi:10.1117/1.2187970
History: Received August 16, 2005; Revised December 09, 2005; Accepted December 12, 2005; Published March 27, 2006
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We report the design, integration, and validation of a fluorescence microscopy system for imaging of electroperturbation—the effects of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulsed electric fields on biological cells and tissues. Such effects have potential applications in cancer therapy, gene regulation, and biophysical research by noninvasively disrupting intracellular compartments and inducing apoptosis in malignant cells. As the primary observing platform, an epifluorescence microscope integrating a nanosecond high-voltage pulser and a micrometer electrode chamber enable in situ imaging of the intracellular processes triggered by high electric fields. Using specific fluorescence molecular probes, the dynamic biological responses of Jurkat T lymphocytes to nanosecond electric pulses (nanoelectropulses) are studied with this system, including calcium bursts, the polarized translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS), and nuclear enlargement and chromatin∕DNA structural changes.

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© 2006 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Yinghua Sun ; P. Thomas Vernier ; Matthew Behrend ; Jingjing Wang ; Mya Mya Thu, et al.
"Fluorescence microscopy imaging of electroperturbation in mammalian cells", J. Biomed. Opt. 11(2), 024010 (March 27, 2006). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2187970


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