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Research Papers

Three-dimensional imaging of whole rodent organs using optical computed and emission tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
Mark Oldham

Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology and Biomedical Engineering, Durham, North Carolina 27710

Harshad Sakhalkar, Ying Min Wang, Pengyi Guo

Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, North Carolina 27710

Tim Oliver

Duke University Medical Center, Department of Cell Biology, Durham, North Carolina 27710

Rex Bentley

Duke University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Durham, North Carolina 27710

Zeljko Vujaskovic, Mark Dewhirst

Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, North Carolina 27710

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(1), 014009 (March 02, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2709858
History: Received May 18, 2006; Revised November 09, 2006; Accepted November 10, 2006; Published March 02, 2007
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We explore the potential of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) in a new area—whole organ imaging. The techniques are implemented on an in-house prototype benchtop system with improved image quality and the capacity to image larger samples (up to 3cm) than previous systems based on stereo microscopes. Imaging performance tests confirm high geometrical accuracy, accurate relative measurement of linear attenuation coefficients, and the ability to image features at the 50-μm level. Optical labeling of organ microvasculature was achieved using two stains deposited via natural in vivo circulatory processes: a passive absorbing ink-based stain and an active fluorescin FITC-lectin conjugate. The lectin protein binds to the endothelial lining, and FITC fluorescense enables optical-ECT imaging. Three-dimensional (3-D) optical-CT images have been acquired of a normal rat heart and left lung and a mouse right lung showing exquisite detail of the functional vasculature and relative perfusion distribution. Coregistered optical-ECT images were also acquired of the mouse lung and kidney. Histological sections confirmed effective labeling of microvasculature throughout the organs. The advantages of optical-CT and optical-ECT include the potential for a unique combination of high resolution and high contrast and compatibility with a wide variety of optical probes, including gene expression labeling fluorescent reporter proteins.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Mark Oldham ; Harshad Sakhalkar ; Ying Min Wang ; Pengyi Guo ; Tim Oliver, et al.
"Three-dimensional imaging of whole rodent organs using optical computed and emission tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(1), 014009 (March 02, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2709858


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