Research Papers

High-resolution whole organ imaging using two-photon tissue cytometry

[+] Author Affiliations
Timothy Ragan

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Biological Engineering, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and TissueVision, Inc., One Kendall Square PMB 141, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Jeremy D. Sylvan

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Ki Hean Kim

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Biological Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Hayden Huang

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Karsten Bahlmann

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Biological Engineering, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and TissueVision, Inc., One Kendall Square PMB 141, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Richard T. Lee

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Peter T. C. So

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Biological Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(1), 014015 (February 05, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2435626
History: Received July 27, 2006; Revised October 24, 2006; Accepted November 09, 2006; Published February 05, 2007
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Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue imaging offers substantial benefits to a wide range of biomedical investigations from cardiovascular biology, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease to cancer. Two-photon tissue cytometry is a novel technique based on high-speed multiphoton microscopy coupled with automated histological sectioning, which can quantify tissue morphology and physiology throughout entire organs with subcellular resolution. Furthermore, two-photon tissue cytometry offers all the benefits of fluorescence-based approaches including high specificity and sensitivity and appropriateness for molecular imaging of gene and protein expression. We use two-photon tissue cytometry to image an entire mouse heart at subcellular resolution to quantify the 3-D morphology of cardiac microvasculature and myocyte morphology spanning almost five orders of magnitude in length scales.

Figures in this Article
© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Photons ; Tissues ; Heart

Citation

Timothy Ragan ; Jeremy D. Sylvan ; Ki Hean Kim ; Hayden Huang ; Karsten Bahlmann, et al.
"High-resolution whole organ imaging using two-photon tissue cytometry", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(1), 014015 (February 05, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2435626


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