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Diagnosis of breast cancer using elastic-scattering spectroscopy: preliminary clinical results

[+] Author Affiliations
Irving J. Bigio

Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-E535, Los Alamos, New Mexico?87545

Stephen G. Bown, Gavin Briggs

National Medical Laser Centre, University College London, London?W1P?7LD, United Kingdom

Christine Kelley

Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-E535, Los Alamos, New Mexico?87545

Sunil Lakhani

Department of Histopathology, The Royal Free and University College Medical School, London?W1P?7LD, United Kingdom

David Pickard

National Medical Laser Centre, University College London, London?W1P?7LD, United Kingdom

Paul M. Ripley, Ian G. Rose

Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-E535, Los Alamos, New Mexico?87545

Christobel Saunders

Department of Surgery, The Royal Free and University College Medical School, London?W1P?7LD, United Kingdom

J. Biomed. Opt. 5(2), 221-228 (Apr 01, 2000). doi:10.1117/1.429990
History: Received Sep. 3, 1999; Revised Dec. 22, 1999; Accepted Jan. 19, 2000
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Abstract

We report on the first stages of a clinical study designed to test elastic-scattering spectroscopy, mediated by fiberoptic probes, for three specific clinical applications in breast-tissue diagnosis: (1) a transdermal-needle (interstitial) measurement for instant diagnosis with minimal invasiveness similar to fine-needle aspiration but with sensitivity to a larger tissue volume, (2) a hand-held diagnostic probe for use in assessing tumor/resection margins during open surgery, and (3) use of the same probe for real-time assessment of the “sentinel” node during surgery to determine the presence or absence of tumor (metastatic). Preliminary results from in vivo measurements on 31 women are encouraging. Optical spectra were measured on 72 histology sites in breast tissue, and 54 histology sites in sentinel nodes. Two different artificial intelligence methods of spectral classification were studied. Artificial neural networks yielded sensitivities of 69% and 58%, and specificities of 85% and 93%, for breast tissue and sentinel nodes, respectively. Hierarchical cluster analysis yielded sensitivities of 67% and 91%, and specificities of 79% and 77%, for breast tissue and sentinel nodes, respectively. These values are expected to improve as the data sets continue to grow and more sophisticated data preprocessing is employed. The study will enroll up to 400 patients over the next two years. © 2000 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2000 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Irving J. Bigio ; Stephen G. Bown ; Gavin Briggs ; Christine Kelley ; Sunil Lakhani, et al.
"Diagnosis of breast cancer using elastic-scattering spectroscopy: preliminary clinical results", J. Biomed. Opt. 5(2), 221-228 (Apr 01, 2000). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.429990


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