Research Papers

Excitation wavelength-dependent changes in Raman spectra of whole blood and hemoglobin: comparison of the spectra with 514.5-, 720-, and 1064-nm excitation

[+] Author Affiliations
Hidetoshi Sato

Advanced Engineering Center, RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198, Japan

Hironori Chiba

Development Department, Jokoh Co., Ltd., 731-1, Unane, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 213-8588, Japan

Hideo Tashiro

Advanced Engineering Center, RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198, Japan

Yukihiro Ozaki

Kwansei-Gakuin University, School of Science, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 662-8501, Japan

J. Biomed. Opt. 6(3), 366-370 (Jul 01, 2001). doi:10.1117/1.1380668
History: Received Sep. 20, 2000; Revised Jan. 24, 2001; Accepted Feb. 9, 2001
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Raman spectra of whole blood and oxy-hemoglobin (Hb) were measured under the same conditions with visible (514.5 nm) and near-infrared (NIR; 720 and 1064 nm) excitation, and the obtained spectra were compared in detail. The Raman spectrum of blood excited with visible light is dominated by very intense bands due to carotenoids, so that it was difficult to obtain information about Hb from the spectrum. The Raman spectra of whole blood and oxy-Hb excited with 720 nm light are very close to each other; both spectra are essentially Raman spectra of the heme chromophore that is preresonant with Q bands. Qualitative spectral analysis including band assignment and investigation of nature of resonance effect were carried out for the Raman spectra with 720 nm excitation. The spectra of whole blood and oxy-Hb excited with 1064 nm light contain contributions from nonresonance Raman spectra of the heme chromophore and Raman spectra of proteins. The 1064 nm excited spectra of blood and oxy-Hb are similar to each other but different in some features. For example, bands due to protein appear stronger in the spectrum of whole blood than in that of oxy-Hb which does not contain protein except globin part. The comparison between the 514.5, 720, and 1064 nm excited Raman spectra reveal that the excitation wavelength of 720 nm is more practical than that of visible light and 1064 nm in the Raman analysis of Hb, such as oxygenation, specially in situ measurement. © 2001 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2001 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Blood ; Near infrared

Citation

Hidetoshi Sato ; Hironori Chiba ; Hideo Tashiro and Yukihiro Ozaki
"Excitation wavelength-dependent changes in Raman spectra of whole blood and hemoglobin: comparison of the spectra with 514.5-, 720-, and 1064-nm excitation", J. Biomed. Opt. 6(3), 366-370 (Jul 01, 2001). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1380668


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