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CONTENTS

Spectroscopy enhances the information content of optical mammography

[+] Author Affiliations
A. E. Cerussi, D. Jakubowski, N. Shah, F. Bevilacqua, R. Lanning

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Rd., Irvine, California?92612

A. J. Berger

University of Rochester, Institute of Optics, Wilmot 418, Rochester, New York?14627

D. Hsiang, J. Butler

University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Department of Oncological Surgery, 101 The City Dr., Orange, California?92868

R. F. Holcombe

University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Division of Hematology/Oncology, 101 The City Dr., Orange, California 92868

B. J. Tromberg

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Rd., Irvine, California 92612

J. Biomed. Opt. 7(1), 60-71 (Jan 01, 2002). doi:10.1117/1.1427050
History: Received May 15, 2001; Revised Aug. 30, 2001; Accepted Aug. 30, 2001
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Near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical spectroscopy and imaging may enhance existing technologies for breast cancer screening, diagnosis, and treatment. NIR techniques are based on quantitative measurements of functional contrast between healthy and diseased tissue. In this study we measured the spectral dependence of tissue absorption (μa) and reduced scattering (μs) in the breasts of 30 healthy women and one woman with a fibroadenoma using a seven-wavelength frequency-domain photon migration probe. Subjects included pre- and postmenopausal women between the ages of 18 and 64. Multi-spectral measurements were used along with a four-component fit to determine the concentrations of de-oxy and oxy-hemoglobin, water and lipids in breast. The scattering spectral shape was also quantified. Our measurements demonstrate that the measured concentrations of NIR analytes correlate well with known breast physiology. Although the tissue scattering at a single wavelength was found to have little value as a functional parameter, the dependence of the scattering on wavelength provided key insights into breast composition and physiology. Lipids and scattering spectra in the breast were found to increase and decrease, respectively, with increasing body mass index. Simple calculations are also provided to demonstrate potential penalties from ignoring the contributions of water and lipids in breast measurements. Finally, water is shown to be a possible indicator for detecting a fibroadenoma, whereas the hemoglobin saturation was found to be a poor indicator. Multi-spectral measurements, compared to measurements restricted to one or two wavelengths, provide additional information that may be useful in managing breast disease. © 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

A. E. Cerussi ; D. Jakubowski ; N. Shah ; F. Bevilacqua ; R. Lanning, et al.
"Spectroscopy enhances the information content of optical mammography", J. Biomed. Opt. 7(1), 60-71 (Jan 01, 2002). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1427050


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