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SPECIAL SECTION ON TISSUE POLARIMETRY

Comparative study of polarized light propagation in biologic tissues

[+] Author Affiliations
Vanitha Sankaran

Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, Irvine, California?92612

and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Medical Technology Program, Livermore, California?94551

Joseph T. Walsh

Northwestern University, Biomedical Engineering Department, Evanston, Illinois?60208

Duncan J. Maitland

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Medical Technology Program, Livermore, California?94551

J. Biomed. Opt. 7(3), 300-306 (Jul 01, 2002). doi:10.1117/1.1483318
History: Received Dec. 1, 2001; Revised Mar. 31, 2002; Accepted May 31, 2002; Online August 01, 2002
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We report the depolarization of light scattered by a variety of birefringent and nonbirefringent tissues. We used Stokes polarimetry to investigate how scatterer structures in each tissue contribute to the depolarization of linearly versus circularly polarized light propagating through that tissue. Experiments were performed on porcine blood, fat, tendon, artery, and myocardium. The results indicate that the two incident polarization states are depolarized differently depending on the structure of the sample. As seen in sphere suspensions, for tissues containing dilute Mie scatterers, circularly polarized light is maintained preferentially over linearly polarized light. For more dense tissues, however, the reverse is true. The results illustrate situations where polarized light will provide an improvement over unpolarized light imaging, information that is crucial to optimizing existing polarimetric imaging techniques. © 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

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© 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Vanitha Sankaran ; Joseph T. Walsh, Jr. and Duncan J. Maitland
"Comparative study of polarized light propagation in biologic tissues", J. Biomed. Opt. 7(3), 300-306 (Jul 01, 2002). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1483318


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