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Research Papers

Light scattering from normal and dysplastic cervical cells at different epithelial depths: finite-difference time-domain modeling with a perfectly matched layer boundary condition

[+] Author Affiliations
Dizem Arifler

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, Texas 78712

Martial Guillaud, Anita Carraro

University of British Columbia, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada V5Z1L3

Anais Malpica

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, Box 0085, Houston, Texas 77030

Michele Follen

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Biomedical Engineering Center, Box 0193, Houston, Texas 77030

Rebecca R. Richards-Kortum

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, Texas 78712

J. Biomed. Opt. 8(3), 484-494 (Jul 01, 2003). doi:10.1117/1.1578640
History: Received Sep. 16, 2002; Revised Dec. 20, 2002; Accepted Jan. 2, 2003; Online July 18, 2003
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The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method provides a flexible approach to studying the scattering that arises from arbitrarily inhomogeneous structures. We implemented a three-dimensional FDTD program code to model light scattering from biological cells. The perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition has been used to terminate the FDTD computational grid. We investigated differences in angle-dependent scattering properties of normal and dysplastic cervical cells. Specifically, the scattering patterns and phase functions have been computed for normal and dysplastic cervical cells at three different epithelial depths, namely, basal/parabasal, intermediate, and superficial. Construction of cervical cells within the FDTD computational grid is based on morphological and chromatin texture features obtained from quantitative histopathology. The results show that angle-dependent scattering characteristics are different not only for normal and dysplastic cells but also for cells at different epithelial depths. The calculated scattering cross-sections are significantly greater for dysplastic cells. The scattering cross-sections of cells at different depths indicate that scattering decreases in going from the superficial layer to the intermediate layer, but then increases in the basal/parabasal layer. This trend for epithelial cell scattering has also been observed in confocal images of ex vivo cervical tissue. © 2003 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

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© 2003 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Dizem Arifler ; Martial Guillaud ; Anais Malpica ; Michele Follen ; Rebecca R. Richards-Kortum, et al.
"Light scattering from normal and dysplastic cervical cells at different epithelial depths: finite-difference time-domain modeling with a perfectly matched layer boundary condition", J. Biomed. Opt. 8(3), 484-494 (Jul 01, 2003). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1578640


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