Research Papers

Imaging ex vivo and in vitro brain morphology in animal models with ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
Kostadinka Bizheva, Angelika Unterhuber, Boris Hermann, Boris Povazˇay, Harald Sattmann, Wolfgang Drexler

Department of Medical Physics, Medical University of Vienna and Christian Doppler Laboratory, Vienna?A-1090, Austria

Andreas Stingl, Tuan Le

FEMTOLASERS GmbH, Fernkorngasse 10, Vienna?A-1010, Austria

Michael Mei, Ronald Holzwarth

MenloSystems GmbH, D-80799?Munchen, Germany

Herbert A. Reitsamer

Department of Physiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna?A-1090, Austria

John E. Morgan, Alan Cowey

University Hospital of Wales Health Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom

J. Biomed. Opt. 9(4), 719-724 (Jul 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1756920
History: Received Sep. 17, 2003; Revised Dec. 1, 2003; Accepted Dec. 5, 2003; Online July 12, 2004
Text Size: A A A

The feasibility of ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR OCT) to image ex vivo and in vitro brain tissue morphology on a scale from single neuron cells to a whole animal brain was investigated using a number of animal models. Sub-2-μm axial resolution OCT in biological tissue was achieved at different central wavelengths by separately interfacing two state-of-the-art broad bandwidth light sources (titanium:sapphire, Ti:Al2O3 laser, λc=800nm,Δλ=260nm,Pout=50mW and a fiber laser light source, λc=1350nm,Δλ=470nm,Pout=4mW) to free-space or fiber-based OCT systems, designed for optimal performance in the appropriate wavelength regions. The ability of sub-2-μm axial resolution OCT to visualize intracellular morphology was demonstrated by imaging living ganglion cells in cultures. The feasibility of UHR OCT to image the globular structure of an entire animal brain as well as to resolve fine morphological features at various depths in it was tested by imaging a fixed honeybee brain. Possible degradation of OCT axial resolution with depth in optically dense brain tissue was examined by depositing microspheres through the blood stream to various depths in the brain of a living rabbit. It was determined that in the 1100 to 1600-nm wavelength range, OCT axial resolution was well preserved, even at depths greater than 500 μm, and permitted distinct visualization of microspheres 15 μm in diameter. In addition, the OCT image penetration depth and the scattering properties of gray and white brain matter were evaluated in tissue samples from the visual cortex of a fixed monkey brain. © 2004 American Institute of Physics.

© 2004 American Institute of Physics

Citation

Kostadinka Bizheva ; Angelika Unterhuber ; Boris Hermann ; Boris Povazˇay ; Harald Sattmann, et al.
"Imaging ex vivo and in vitro brain morphology in animal models with ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 9(4), 719-724 (Jul 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1756920


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.