Research Papers

Spectroscopic detection of bladder cancer using near-infrared imaging techniques

[+] Author Affiliations
Stavros G. Demos

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California?94551

University of California Davis Medical School, Medical Center, Sacramento, California?95817

Regina Gandour-Edwards, Rajen Ramsamooj, Ralph deVere White

University of California Davis Medical School, Medical Center, Sacramento, California?95817

J. Biomed. Opt. 9(4), 767-771 (Jul 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1753587
History: Received Jun. 24, 2003; Revised Oct. 24, 2003; Accepted Oct. 30, 2003; Online July 12, 2004
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High-contrast imaging of bladder cancer is demonstrated using near-infrared autofluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation in combination with cross-polarized elastic light scattering. Fresh unprocessed surgical specimens obtained following cystectomy or transurethral resection were utilized and a set of images for each tissue sample was recorded. These images were compared with the histopathology of the tissue sample. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the near-infrared emission as well as that of the cross-polarized backscattered light was considerably different in cancer tissues than in that of the contiguous nonneoplastic tissues, allowing an accurate delineation of a tumor’s margins. © 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Stavros G. Demos ; Regina Gandour-Edwards ; Rajen Ramsamooj and Ralph deVere White
"Spectroscopic detection of bladder cancer using near-infrared imaging techniques", J. Biomed. Opt. 9(4), 767-771 (Jul 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1753587


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