Research Papers

Parallel single molecule detection with a fully integrated single-photon 2×2 CMOS detector array

[+] Author Affiliations
Michael Go¨sch

Karolinska Institute, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, S-171?77 Stockholm, Sweden

E´cole Polytechnique Fe´de´rale de Lausanne, Laboratoire d’Optique Biomedicale, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Alexandre Serov, Tiemo Anhut, Theo Lasser

E´cole Polytechnique Fe´de´rale de Lausanne Laboratoire d"Optique Biomedicale CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Alexis Rochas, Pierre-Andre´ Besse, Radivoje S. Popovic

E´cole Polytechnique Fe´de´rale de Lausanne, Institute of Microelectronics and Microsystems, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Hans Blom

Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Microelectronics and Information Technology, Electrum 229, S-16440?Kista, Sweden

Rudolf Rigler

Karolinska Institute, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden E-mail: rudolf.rigler@mbb.ki.se

J. Biomed. Opt. 9(5), 913-921 (Sep 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1781668
History: Received Aug. 11, 2003; Revised Jan. 27, 2004; Accepted Feb. 17, 2004; Online September 17, 2004
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We present parallel single molecule detection (SMD) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments with a fully integrated complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) single-photon 2×2 detector array. Multifocal excitation is achieved with a diffractive optical element (DOE). Special emphasis is placed on parallelization of the total system. The performance of the novel single-photon CMOS detector is investigated and compared to a state-of-the-art single-photon detecting module [having an actively quenched avalanche photodiode (APD)] by measurements on free diffusing molecules at different concentrations. Despite the order of magnitude lower detection efficiency of the CMOS detector compared to the state-of-the-art single-photon detecting module, we achieve single molecule sensitivity and reliably determine molecule concentrations. In addition, the CMOS detector performance for the determination of the fraction of slowly diffusing molecules in a primer solution (two-component analysis) is demonstrated. The potential of this new technique for high-throughput confocal-detection-based systems is discussed. © 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Michael Go¨sch ; Alexandre Serov ; Tiemo Anhut ; Theo Lasser ; Alexis Rochas, et al.
"Parallel single molecule detection with a fully integrated single-photon 2×2 CMOS detector array", J. Biomed. Opt. 9(5), 913-921 (Sep 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1781668


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