Special Section on Optics in Neuroscience

Near-infrared spectroscopy for functional studies of brain activity in human infants: promise, prospects, and challenges

[+] Author Affiliations
Richard N. Aslin

University of Rochester, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Rochester, New York

Jacques Mehler

SISSA, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy

J. Biomed. Opt. 10(1), 011009 (Feb. 8, 2005). doi:10.1117/1.1854672
History: Received Feb. 20, 2004; Revised May 14, 2004; Accepted May 21, 2004; Feb. 8, 2005; Online February 08, 2005
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Abstract

A recent workshop brought together a mix of researchers with expertise in optical physics, cerebral hemodynamics, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychology to review the potential utility of near-IR spectroscopy (NIRS) for studies of brain activity underlying cognitive processing in human infants. We summarize the key findings that emerged from this workshop and outline the pros and cons of NIRS for studying the brain correlates of perceptual, cognitive, and language development in human infants. © 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Richard N. Aslin and Jacques Mehler
"Near-infrared spectroscopy for functional studies of brain activity in human infants: promise, prospects, and challenges", J. Biomed. Opt. 10(1), 011009 (Feb. 8, 2005). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1854672


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