Research Papers

Simulations of light scattering from a biconcave red blood cell using the finite-difference time-domain method

[+] Author Affiliations
Jun Q. Lu

East Carolina University, Department of Physics, Greenville, North Carolina, 27858E-mail: luj@mail.ecu.edu

Ping Yang

Texas A & M University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, College Station, Texas 77843

Xin-Hua Hu

East Carolina University, Department of Physics, Greenville, North Carolina 27858

J. Biomed. Opt. 10(2), 024022 (Apr. 4, 2005). doi:10.1117/1.1897397
History: Received Feb. 17, 2004; Revised Jun. 25, 2004; Accepted Aug. 27, 2004; Apr. 4, 2005; Online April 04, 2005
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Numerical simulations of light scattering by a biconcave shaped human red blood cell (RBC) are carried out using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. A previously developed FDTD code for the study of light scattering by ice crystals is modified for the current purpose and it is validated against Mie theory using a spherically shaped RBC. Numerical results for the angular distributions of the Mueller scattering matrix elements of an RBC and their dependence on shape, orientation, and wavelength are presented. Also calculated are the scattering and absorption efficiencies. The implication of these results on the possibility of probing RBC shape changes is discussed. © 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jun Q. Lu ; Ping Yang and Xin-Hua Hu
"Simulations of light scattering from a biconcave red blood cell using the finite-difference time-domain method", J. Biomed. Opt. 10(2), 024022 (Apr. 4, 2005). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1897397


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