Research Papers

Use of a multiseparation fiber optic probe for the optical diagnosis of breast cancer

[+] Author Affiliations
Changfang Zhu

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

Gregory M. Palmer

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

Tara M. Breslin

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

Fushen Xu

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

Nirmala Ramanujam

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, #2144 Engineering Centers Building, 1550 Engineering Dr., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 E-mail: nimmi@engr.wisc.edu

J. Biomed. Opt. 10(2), 024032 (Apr. 26, 2005). doi:10.1117/1.1897398
History: Received Mar. 26, 2004; Revised Aug. 23, 2004; Accepted Nov. 5, 2004; Apr. 26, 2005; Online April 26, 2005
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We explore the effects of the illumination and collection geometry on optical spectroscopic diagnosis of breast cancer. Fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the UV-visible spectral range are made with a multiseparation probe at three illumination-collection separations of 735, 980, and 1225 μm, respectively, from 13 malignant and 34 nonmalignant breast tissues. Statistical analysis is carried out on two types of data inputs: (1) the fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra recorded at each of the three illumination-collection separations and (2) the integrated fluorescence (at each excitation wavelength) or diffuse reflectance over the entire spectrum at all three illumination-collection separations. The results show that using the integrated fluorescence intensities recorded at a single excitation wavelength at all three illumination-collection separations can discriminate malignant from nonmalignant breast tissues with similar classification accuracy to that using spectral data measured at several excitation wavelengths with a single illumination-collection separation. These findings have significant implications with respect to the design of an optical system for breast cancer diagnosis. Examining the intensity attenuation at a single wavelength rather than spectral intensities at multiple wavelengths can significantly reduce the measurement and data processing time in a clinical setting as well as the cost and complexity of the optical system. © 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Changfang Zhu ; Gregory M. Palmer ; Tara M. Breslin ; Fushen Xu and Nirmala Ramanujam
"Use of a multiseparation fiber optic probe for the optical diagnosis of breast cancer", J. Biomed. Opt. 10(2), 024032 (Apr. 26, 2005). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1897398


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