Research Papers

Design of a visible-light spectroscopy clinical tissue oximeter

[+] Author Affiliations
David A. Benaron

Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305, and Spectros Corporation, Portola Valley, California 94028

Ilian H. Parachikov

Spectros Corporation, Portola Valley, California 94028

Wai-Fung Cheong

Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305, and, Spectros Corporation, Portola Valley, California 94028

Shai Friedland

Palo Alto and Livermore V. A. Medical Centers, Department of Gastroenterology, Palo Alto, California

Boris E. Rubinsky, David M. Otten

University of California at Berkeley, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Berkeley, California

Frank W. H. Liu

Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305, and, Spectros Corporation, Portola Valley, California 94028

Carl J. Levinson

Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Palo Alto, California 94305, and, Spectros Corporation, Portola Valley, California 94028

Aileen L. Murphy, John W. Price, Yair Talmi, James P. Weersing, Joshua L. Duckworth, Uwe B. Hörchner, Eben L. Kermit

Spectros Corporation, Portola Valley, California 94028

J. Biomed. Opt. 10(4), 044005 (August 15, 2005). doi:10.1117/1.1979504
History: Received April 24, 2003; Revised June 18, 2004; Accepted February 18, 2005; Published August 15, 2005
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We develop a clinical visible-light spectroscopy (VLS) tissue oximeter. Unlike currently approved near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) or pulse oximetry (SpO2%), VLS relies on locally absorbed, shallow-penetrating visible light (475 to 625 nm) for the monitoring of microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2%), allowing incorporation into therapeutic catheters and probes. A range of probes is developed, including noncontact wands, invasive catheters, and penetrating needles with injection ports. Data are collected from: 1. probes, standards, and reference solutions to optimize each component; 2. ex vivo hemoglobin solutions analyzed for StO2% and pO2 during deoxygenation; and 3. human subject skin and mucosal tissue surfaces. Results show that differential VLS allows extraction of features and minimization of scattering effects, in vitro VLS oximetry reproduces the expected sigmoid hemoglobin binding curve, and in vivo VLS spectroscopy of human tissue allows for real-time monitoring (e.g., gastrointestinal mucosal saturation 69±4%, n=804; gastrointestinal tumor saturation 45±23%, n=14; and p<0.0001), with reproducible values and small standard deviations (SDs) in normal tissues. FDA approved VLS systems began shipping earlier this year. We conclude that VLS is suitable for the real-time collection of spectroscopic and oximetric data from human tissues, and that a VLS oximeter has application to the monitoring of localized subsurface hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the microvascular tissue spaces of human subjects.

Figures in this Article
© 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

David A. Benaron ; Ilian H. Parachikov ; Wai-Fung Cheong ; Shai Friedland ; Boris E. Rubinsky, et al.
"Design of a visible-light spectroscopy clinical tissue oximeter", J. Biomed. Opt. 10(4), 044005 (August 15, 2005). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1979504


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