Research Papers

Measuring microlymphatic flow using fast video microscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
J. Brandon Dixon

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Mail Stop 3120, College Station, Texas 77843

David C. Zawieja, Anatoliy A. Gashev

Texas A&M University, Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Department of Medical Physiology, College Station, Texas 77843-1114

Gerard L. Coté

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Mail Stop 3120, College Station, Texas 77843

J. Biomed. Opt. 10(6), 064016 (November 18, 2005). doi:10.1117/1.2135791
History: Received July 08, 2004; Revised June 17, 2005; Accepted June 27, 2005; Published November 18, 2005
Text Size: A A A

Despite advances in the measurement of lymphatic function, little is known about the actual velocities of flow in microlymphatic (100μm diam) vessels. In this work, video microscopy and particle tracking methods are adapted and integrated with an ultra-high-speed imaging camera to obtain measurements of lymph velocities throughout the entire lymphatic contraction cycle in the ratmesentery, something that previous systems were incapable of measuring. To determine the system’s accuracy, calibration experiments are conducted across the hypothesized physiologically significant range of velocities for microlymphatic flow (up to 15mmsec). The system shows high accuracy, less than 2% error, when comparing actual with measured velocities. Microspheres flowing through 140-μm-diam tubing are imaged to demonstrate the system’s ability to determine flow rates in these small vessels by measuring particle velocities. To demonstrate biological applicability, mesenteric microlymphatics in loops of the small intestine of three male Sprague-Dawley rats are exteriorized and imaged with the high-speed system at a rate of 500framessec for several contraction sequences. Lymph velocity fluctuates cyclically with the vessel wall contractions, ranging from 1to7mmsec. These rates are higher than would be possible with standard video microscopy (3.75mmsec maximum).

Figures in this Article
© 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

J. Brandon Dixon ; David C. Zawieja ; Anatoliy A. Gashev and Gerard L. Coté
"Measuring microlymphatic flow using fast video microscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 10(6), 064016 (November 18, 2005). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2135791


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.