Research Papers

Morphological effects of nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation on human middle ear ossicles

[+] Author Affiliations
Justus Ilgner

RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic Head and Neck Surgery, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen, Germany

Martin Wehner

Fraunhofer Institute for Lasertechnology (ILT), Steinbachstrasse 15, 52074 Aachen, Germany

Johann Lorenzen, Manfred Bovi

RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Institute of Pathology Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen, Germany

Martin Westhofen

RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic Head and Neck Surgery, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen, Germany

J. Biomed. Opt. 11(1), 014004 (January 24, 2006). doi:10.1117/1.2166432
History: Received July 02, 2005; Revised September 25, 2005; Accepted September 26, 2005; Published January 24, 2006
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We evaluate the feasibility of nanosecond-pulsed and femtosecond-pulsed lasers for otologic surgery. The outcome parameters are cutting precision (in micrometers), ablation rate (in micrometers per second), scanning speed (in millimeters per second), and morphological effects on human middle ear ossicles. We examine single-spot ablations by a nanosecond-pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser (355nm, beam diameter 10μm, pulse rate 2kHz, power 250mW) on isolated human mallei. A similar system (355nm, beam diameter 20μm, pulse rate 10kHz, power 1601500mW) and a femtosecond-pulsed CrLi:SAF-Laser (850nm, pulse duration 100fs, pulse energy 40μJ, beam diameter 36μm, pulse rate 1kHz) are coupled to a scanner to perform bone surface ablation over a defined area. In our setups 1 and 2, marginal carbonization is visible in all single-spot ablations of 1-s exposures and longer: With an exposure time of 0.5s, precise cutting margins without carbonization are observed. Cooling with saline solution result is in no carbonization at 1500mW and a scan speed of 500mms. Our third setup shows no carbonization but greater cutting precision, although the ablation volume is lower. Nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser systems bear the potential to increase cutting precision in otologic surgery.

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© 2006 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Justus Ilgner ; Martin Wehner ; Johann Lorenzen ; Manfred Bovi and Martin Westhofen
"Morphological effects of nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation on human middle ear ossicles", J. Biomed. Opt. 11(1), 014004 (January 24, 2006). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2166432


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