Research Papers

Intrinsic fluorescence and redox changes associated with apoptosis of primary human epithelial cells

[+] Author Affiliations
Jonathan M. Levitt

Tufts University, Biomedical Engineering Department, Medford, Massachusetts 02155

Amy Baldwin

Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, The Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Antonios Papadakis

University Hospital of Herakleion, Radiology Department, Herakleion, Greece 71110

Sameer Puri, Joanna Xylas

Tufts University, Biomedical Engineering Department, Medford, Massachusetts 02155

Karl Münger

Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, The Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Irene Georgakoudi

Tufts University, Biomedical Engineering Department, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 and Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

J. Biomed. Opt. 11(6), 064012 (December 18, 2006). doi:10.1117/1.2401149
History: Received February 16, 2006; Revised July 19, 2006; Accepted July 19, 2006; Published December 18, 2006; Online December 18, 2006
Text Size: A A A

Apoptosis plays a key role in the development and maintenance of human tissues. This process has been studied traditionally in cells that are stained with exogenous fluorophores. These approaches affect cell viability, and thus are ill-suited for in vivo applications. We present an imaging approach that can identify apoptotic cells in living cell populations based on detection and quantification of distinct changes in the intensity and localization of cellular autofluorescence. Specifically, we acquire NAD(P)H, FAD, and redox ratio autofluorescence images of primary keratinocytes following 1, 9, 14, and 18h of treatment with cisplatin, a known apoptosis-inducing chemotherapy agent. We find that intense autofluorescence combined with a low redox fluorescence ratio is progressively confined to a gradually smaller perinuclear cytoplasmic region with cisplatin treatment. Studies with exogenous nuclear fluorophores demonstrate that these autofluorescence changes occur at early stages of apoptosis. Additional costaining experiments suggest that this strongly autofluorescent, highly metabolically active perinuclear ring represents a subpopulation of mitochondria that are mobilized in response to the apoptotic stimulus and may provide the energy required to execute the final apoptotic steps. Thus, autofluorescence localization changes could serve as a sensitive, noninvasive indicator of early apoptosis in vivo.

Figures in this Article
© 2006 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Luminescence

Citation

Jonathan M. Levitt ; Amy Baldwin ; Antonios Papadakis ; Sameer Puri ; Joanna Xylas, et al.
"Intrinsic fluorescence and redox changes associated with apoptosis of primary human epithelial cells", J. Biomed. Opt. 11(6), 064012 (December 18, 2006). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2401149


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.