Research Papers

Quantitative spatial comparison of diffuse optical imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labeling-based functional magnetic resonance imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Theodore J. Huppert

Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, 13th Street, Building 149, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and Harvard University, Graduate Program in Biophysics, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Rick D. Hoge

Unité de neuroimagerie fonctionnelle, Centre de recherche universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal et Départment de physiologie, Université de Montréal, 4565 chemin Queen Mary, Salle 6803, Montreal QC, Canada

Anders M. Dale

University of California, San Diego, Departments of Neurosciences, Radiology, and Cognitive Science, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093

Maria A. Franceschini, David A. Boas

Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, 13th Street, Building 149, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129

J. Biomed. Opt. 11(6), 064018 (December 04, 2006). doi:10.1117/1.2400910
History: Received November 08, 2005; Revised June 29, 2006; Accepted July 03, 2006; Published December 04, 2006; Online December 04, 2006
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Akin to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a noninvasive method for measuring localized changes in hemoglobin levels within the brain. When combined with fMRI methods, multimodality approaches could offer an integrated perspective on the biophysics, anatomy, and physiology underlying each of the imaging modalities. Vital to the correct interpretation of such studies, control experiments to test the consistency of both modalities must be performed. Here, we compare DOI with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling fMRI-based methods in order to explore the spatial agreement of the response amplitudes recorded by these two methods. Rather than creating optical images by regularized, tomographic reconstructions, we project the fMRI image into optical measurement space using the optical forward problem. We report statistically better spatial correlation between the fMRI-BOLD response and the optically measured deoxyhemoglobin (R=0.71, p=1×107) than between the BOLD and oxyhemoglobin or total hemoglobin measures (R=0.38, p=0.040.37, p=0.05, respectively). Similarly, we find that the correlation between the ASL measured blood flow and optically measured total and oxyhemoglobin is stronger (R=0.73, p=5×106 and R=0.71, p=9×106, respectively) than the flow to deoxyhemoglobin spatial correlation (R=0.26, p=0.10).

Figures in this Article
© 2006 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Theodore J. Huppert ; Rick D. Hoge ; Anders M. Dale ; Maria A. Franceschini and David A. Boas
"Quantitative spatial comparison of diffuse optical imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labeling-based functional magnetic resonance imaging", J. Biomed. Opt. 11(6), 064018 (December 04, 2006). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2400910


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