Research Papers

Plasmon resonance coupling of metal nanoparticles for molecular imaging of carcinogenesis in vivo

[+] Author Affiliations
Jesse Aaron

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, Texas 78712

Nitin Nitin

Rice University, Department of Bioengineering, Houston, Texas 77005

Kort Travis

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Physics, Austin, Texas 78712

Sonia Kumar, Tom Collier, Sun Young Park

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, Texas 78712

Miguel José-Yacamán

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Chemical Engineering, Austin, Texas 78712

Lezlee Coghlan

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Research Park Science Division, Smithville, Texas 78957

Michele Follen

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Houston, Texas 77030

Rebecca Richards-Kortum

Rice University, Department of Bioengineering, Houston, Texas 77005

Konstantin Sokolov

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Houston, Texas 77030, and University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, Texas 78712

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(3), 034007 (May 21, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2737351
History: Received October 20, 2006; Revised March 07, 2007; Accepted March 07, 2007; Published May 21, 2007
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An effective cancer control strategy requires improved early detection methods, patient-specific drug selection, and the ability to assess response to targeted therapeutics. Recently, plasmon resonance coupling between closely spaced metal nanoparticles has been used to develop ultrasensitive bioanalytical assays in vitro. We demonstrate the first in vivo application of plasmon coupling for molecular imaging of carcinogenesis. We describe molecular-specific gold bioconjugates to image epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); these conjugates can be delivered topically and imaged noninvasively in real time. We show that labeling with gold bioconjugates gives information on the overexpression and nanoscale spatial relationship of EGF receptors in cell membranes, both of which are altered in neoplasia. EGFR-mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles in neoplastic cells results in more than a 100-nm color shift and a contrast ratio of more than tenfold in images of normal and precancerous epithelium in vivo, dramatically increasing contrast beyond values reported previously for antibody-targeted fluorescent dyes.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jesse Aaron ; Nitin Nitin ; Kort Travis ; Sonia Kumar ; Tom Collier, et al.
"Plasmon resonance coupling of metal nanoparticles for molecular imaging of carcinogenesis in vivo", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(3), 034007 (May 21, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2737351


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