Research Papers

Instrumentation as a source of variability in the application of fluorescence spectroscopic devices for detecting cervical neoplasia

[+] Author Affiliations
Brian M. Pikkula, Olga Shuhatovich, Roderick L. Price, Dan M. Serachitopol

University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Biomedical Engineering Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Box 193, Houston, Texas 77030

Michele Follen

University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Biomedical Engineering Center, Department of Gynecologic Oncology, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Box 193, Houston, Texas 77030 andThe University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Houston, Texas, 77030

Nick McKinnon, Calum MacAulay

British Columbia Cancer Research Center, Department of Cancer Imaging, 601 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V5Z 1 L3

Rebecca Richards-Kortum

Rice University, Department of Bioengineering, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77005

Jong Soo Lee

University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Biomedical Engineering Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Box 193, Houston, Texas 77030 andCarnegie Mellon University, Department of Statistics, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213

E. Neely Atkinson

University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, The Department of Biostatistics, Houston, Texas 77030

Dennis D. Cox

Rice University, Department of Statistics, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77005

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(3), 034014 (June 12, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2745285
History: Received September 13, 2006; Revised February 09, 2007; Accepted February 13, 2007; Published June 12, 2007
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We report on a study designed to assess variability among three different fluorescence spectroscopy devices, four fiber optic probes, and three sets of optical calibration standards to better understand the reproducibility of measurements and interdevice comparisons of fluorescence spectroscopic data intended for clinical diagnostic use. Multiple measurements are acquired from all sets of standards using each combination of spectrometer, fiber optic probe, and optical standard. Data are processed using standard calibration methods to remove instrument-dependant responses. Processed spectra are analyzed using an analysis of variance to assess the percent variance explained by each factor that was statistically significant. Analysis of processed data confirms statistically significant differences among the spectrometers and fiber optic probes. However, no differences are found when varying calibration standards or measurement date and time. The spectrometers and fiber optic probes are significant sources of variability, but appropriate data processing substantially reduces these effects. Studies of inter- and intradevice variability are important methodological issues for optical device trials and must be included in the quality assurance studies for the clinical trial design.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Brian M. Pikkula ; Olga Shuhatovich ; Roderick L. Price ; Dan M. Serachitopol ; Michele Follen, et al.
"Instrumentation as a source of variability in the application of fluorescence spectroscopic devices for detecting cervical neoplasia", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(3), 034014 (June 12, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2745285


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