Research Papers

Quantitative comparison of tissue oxygen and motexafin lutetium uptake by ex vivo and noninvasive in vivo techniques in patients with intraperitoneal carcinomatosis

[+] Author Affiliations
Hsing-Wen Wang

University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and University of Pennsylvania, Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Jarod C. Finlay

University of Pennsylvania, Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Kijoon Lee

University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Timothy C. Zhu

University of Pennsylvania, Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mary E. Putt

University of Pennsylvania, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Eli Glatstein, Cameron J. Koch, Sydney M. Evans, Steve M. Hahn, Theresa M. Busch

University of Pennsylvania, Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Arjun G. Yodh

University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and University of Pennsylvania, Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(3), 034023 (May 29, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2743082
History: Received September 12, 2006; Revised February 22, 2007; Accepted February 26, 2007; Published May 29, 2007
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Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to noninvasively monitor optical properties during photodynamic therapy (PDT). This technique has been extensively validated in tissue phantoms; however, validation in patients has been limited. This pilot study compares blood oxygenation and photosensitizer tissue uptake measured by multiwavelength DRS with ex vivo assays of the hypoxia marker, 2-(2-nitroimida-zol-1[H]-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)acetamide (EF5), and the photosensitizer (motexafin lutetium, MLu) from tissues at the same tumor site of three tumors in two patients with intra-abdominal cancers. Similar in vivo and ex vivo measurements of MLu concentration are carried out in murine radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors (n=9). The selection of optimal DRS wavelength range and source-detector separations is discussed and implemented, and the association between in vivo and ex vivo measurements is examined. The results demonstrate a negative correlation between blood oxygen saturation (StO2) and EF5 binding, consistent with published relationships between EF5 binding and electrode measured pO2, and between electrode measured pO2 and StO2. A tight correspondence is observed between in vivo DRS and ex vivo measured MLu concentration in the RIF tumors; similar data are positively correlated in the human intraperitoneal tumors. These results further demonstrate the potential of in vivo DRS measurements in clinical PDT.

Figures in this Article
© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Hsing-Wen Wang ; Jarod C. Finlay ; Kijoon Lee ; Timothy C. Zhu ; Mary E. Putt, et al.
"Quantitative comparison of tissue oxygen and motexafin lutetium uptake by ex vivo and noninvasive in vivo techniques in patients with intraperitoneal carcinomatosis", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(3), 034023 (May 29, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2743082


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