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Special Section on Optical Diagnostic Imaging from Bench to Bedside Molecular Imaging

Photoacoustic flow cytometry: principle and application for real-time detection of circulating single nanoparticles, pathogens, and contrast dyes in vivo

[+] Author Affiliations
Vladimir P. Zharov

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Phillips Classic Laser Laboratories, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205

Ekaterina I. Galanzha

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Phillips Classic Laser Laboratories, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 and Saratov State University, Institute of Optics and Biophotonics, Saratov 410012, Russia

Evgeny V. Shashkov

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Phillips Classic Laser Laboratories, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 and Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Moscow 119991, Russia

Jin-Woo Kim

University of Arkansas, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

Nikolai G. Khlebtsov

Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Saratov 410049, Russia

Valery V. Tuchin

Saratov State University, Institute of Optics and Biophotonics, Saratov 410012, Russia

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(5), 051503 (October 24, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2793746
History: Received March 19, 2007; Revised May 28, 2007; Accepted June 11, 2007; Published October 24, 2007
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The goal of this work is to develop in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for time-resolved detection of circulating absorbing objects, either without labeling or with nanoparticles as PA labels. This study represents the first attempt, to our knowledge, to demonstrate the capability of PAFC with tunable near-infrared (NIR) pulse lasers for real-time monitoring of gold nanorods, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli labeled with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and contrast dye Lymphazurin in the microvessels of mouse and rat ears and mesenteries. PAFC shows the unprecedented threshold sensitivity in vivo as one gold nanoparticle in the irradiated volume and as one bacterium in the background of 108 of normal blood cells. The CNTs are demonstrated to serve as excellent new NIR high-PA contrast agents. Fast Lymphazurin diffusion in live tissue is observed with rapid blue coloring of a whole animal body. The enhancement of the thermal and acoustic effects is obtained with clustered, multilayer, and exploded nanoparticles.This novel combination of PA microscopy/spectroscopy and flow cytometry may be considered as a new powerful tool in biological research with the potential of quick translation to humans, providing ultrasensitive diagnostics of pathogens (e.g., bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, parasites, helminthes), metastatic, infected, inflamed, stem, and dendritic cells, and pharmacokinetics of drug, liposomes, and nanoparticles in deep vessels (with focused transducers) among other potential applications.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Vladimir P. Zharov ; Ekaterina I. Galanzha ; Evgeny V. Shashkov ; Jin-Woo Kim ; Nikolai G. Khlebtsov, et al.
"Photoacoustic flow cytometry: principle and application for real-time detection of circulating single nanoparticles, pathogens, and contrast dyes in vivo", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(5), 051503 (October 24, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2793746


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