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Special Section on Optical Diagnostic Imaging from Bench to Bedside Coherent Imaging

Clinical diagnosis of potentially treatable early articular cartilage degeneration using optical coherence tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
Constance R. Chu, Nicholas J. Izzo, James J. Irrgang

University of Pittsburgh, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 3471 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1010, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213

Mario Ferretti

Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Rebecca K. Studer

University of Pittsburgh, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

J. Biomed. Opt. 12(5), 051703 (October 19, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2789674
History: Received February 06, 2007; Revised June 27, 2007; Accepted June 27, 2007; Published October 19, 2007
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A series of bench to operating room studies was conducted to determine whether it is feasible to use optical coherence tomography (OCT) clinically to diagnose potentially reversible early cartilage degeneration. A human cadaver study was performed to confirm the reproducibility of OCT imaging and grading based on identification of changes to cartilage OCT form birefringence using a polarized OCT system approved for clinical use. Segregation of grossly normal appearing human articular cartilage into two groups based on the presence or absence of OCT form birefringence showed that cartilage without OCT form birefringence had reduced ability to increase proteoglycan synthetic activity in response to the anabolic growth factor IGF-1. The bench data further show that IGF-1 insensitivity in cartilage without OCT form birefringence was reversible. To show clinical feasibility, OCT was then used arthroscopically in 19 human subjects. Clinical results confirmed that differences to OCT form birefringence observed in ex vivo study were detectable during arthroscopic surgery. More prevalent loss of cartilage OCT form birefringence was observed in cartilage of human subjects in groups more likely to have cartilage degeneration. This series of integrated bench to bedside studies demonstrates translational feasibility to use OCT for clinical studies on whether human cartilage degeneration can be diagnosed early enough for intervention that may delay or prevent the onset of osteoarthritis.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Constance R. Chu ; Mario Ferretti ; Rebecca K. Studer ; Nicholas J. Izzo and James J. Irrgang
"Clinical diagnosis of potentially treatable early articular cartilage degeneration using optical coherence tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 12(5), 051703 (October 19, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2789674


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