Research Papers

Spectral imaging facilitates visualization and measurements of unstable and abnormal microvascular oxygen transport in tumors

[+] Author Affiliations
Brian S. Sorg

University of Florida, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, 130 BME Building, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6131 and Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, North Carolina 27705

Matthew E. Hardee

Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, North Carolina 27705

Nikita Agarwal

University of Florida, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, 130 BME Building, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6131

Benjamin J. Moeller, Mark W. Dewhirst

Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, North Carolina 27705

J. Biomed. Opt. 13(1), 014026 (February 28, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2837439
History: Received May 24, 2007; Revised September 25, 2007; Accepted September 30, 2007; Published February 28, 2008
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Abnormal microvasculature contributes to the pathophysiologic microenvironment of tumors. Understanding microvascular tumor oxygen transport is necessary to comprehend the factors that influence tumor biology, physiology, and therapy. Previously, we described an in vivo spectral imaging microscopy system for measurements of microvessel hemoglobin saturation (HbSat). We measure temporal fluctuations and spatial gradients in tumor microvessel oxygenation and identify instances of anastomoses between vessels with significantly different oxygenations. Slow periodic fluctuations in HbSat <0.2cyclesperminute were observed. These measurements are consistent with microelectrode measurements of fluctuating tumor oxygenation. Gradients in HbSat along individual tumor microvessels were measured that were larger in magnitude than normal tissue microvessels. Images were captured of anastomoses of tumor microvessels with diameters 100μm and significantly different HbSat values (>20%). Shunting of inspired oxygen, presumably due to arteriovenous anastomoses, from tumor feeding arterioles to adjacent venules was imaged. This effect was confined to a region around the tumor and was not observed in nearby normal microvessels. Imaging measurements of tumor microvessel oxygen transport may offer insight to current questions regarding oxygen-related tumor biology and treatment responses, and spectral imaging may be a useful research tool in this regard.

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© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Brian S. Sorg ; Matthew E. Hardee ; Nikita Agarwal ; Benjamin J. Moeller and Mark W. Dewhirst
"Spectral imaging facilitates visualization and measurements of unstable and abnormal microvascular oxygen transport in tumors", J. Biomed. Opt. 13(1), 014026 (February 28, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2837439


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