Research Papers

Probing local tissue changes in the oral cavity for early detection of cancer using oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy: a pilot clinical trial

[+] Author Affiliations
Linda T. Nieman

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030

Chih-Wen Kan

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712-1084

Ann Gillenwater

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030

Mia K. Markey

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712-1084

Konstantin Sokolov

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Department of Imaging Physics, ,1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030

J. Biomed. Opt. 13(2), 024011 (May 01, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2907450
History: Received July 30, 2007; Revised October 09, 2007; Accepted November 16, 2007; Published May 01, 2008
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We report the results of an oral cavity pilot clinical trial to detect early precancer and cancer using a fiber optic probe with obliquely oriented collection fibers that preferentially probe local tissue morphology and heterogeneity using oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS). We extract epithelial cell nuclear sizes and 10 spectral features. These features are analyzed independently and in combination to assess the best metrics for separation of diagnostic classes. Without stratifying the data according to anatomical location or level of keratinization, OPRS is found to be sensitive to four diagnostic categories: normal, benign, mild dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia, and carcinoma. Using linear discriminant analysis, separation of normal from high-grade dysplasia and carcinoma yield a sensitivity and specificity of 90 and 86%, respectively. Discrimination of morphologically similar lesions such as normal from mild dysplasia is achieved with a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 73%. Separation of visually indistinguishable benign lesions from high-grade dysplasia and carcinoma is achieved with good sensitivity (100%) and specificity (85%), while separation of benign from mild dysplasia gives a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 69%. These promising results suggest that OPRS has the potential to aid screening and diagnosis of oral precancer and cancer.

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© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Linda T. Nieman ; Chih-Wen Kan ; Ann Gillenwater ; Mia K. Markey and Konstantin Sokolov
"Probing local tissue changes in the oral cavity for early detection of cancer using oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy: a pilot clinical trial", J. Biomed. Opt. 13(2), 024011 (May 01, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2907450


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