Research Papers

Measurement of muscle disease by quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Sergey V. Plotnikov

University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, and Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Anne M. Kenny

University of Connecticut Health Center, Center on Aging, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Stephen J. Walsh

University of Connecticut Health Center, Center for Community Medicine and Health Care, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Beata Zubrowski, Cherian Joseph

University of Connecticut Health Center, Center on Aging, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Victoria L. Scranton

University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

George A. Kuchel

University of Connecticut Health Center, Center on Aging, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Deborah Dauser

University of Connecticut Health Center, Center for Community Medicine and Health Care, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Manshan Xu, Carol C. Pilbeam

University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Douglas J. Adams

University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Robert P. Dougherty

OptiNav, Inc., 10900 NE 8th Street, Suite 900, Bellevue, Washington 98004

Paul J. Campagnola

University of Connecticut Health Center, Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

William A. Mohler

University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, and Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

J. Biomed. Opt. 13(4), 044018 (August 20, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2967536
History: Received October 25, 2007; Revised February 07, 2008; Accepted February 27, 2008; Published August 20, 2008
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Determining the health of muscle cells by in vivo imaging could impact the diagnosis and monitoring of a large number of congenital and acquired muscular or cardiac disorders. However, currently used technologies are hampered by insufficient resolution, lack of specificity, or invasiveness. We have combined intrinsic optical second-harmonic generation from sarcomeric myosin with a novel mathematical treatment of striation pattern analysis, to obtain measures of muscle contractile integrity that correlate strongly with the neuromuscular health of mice suffering from genetic, acquired, and age-related decline in skeletal muscle function. Analysis of biopsies from a pilot group of human volunteers suggests a similar power in quantifying sarcopenic changes in muscle integrity. These results provide the first strong evidence that quantitative image analysis of sarcomere pattern can be correlated with physiological function, and they invite the application of SHG imaging in clinical practice, either in biopsy samples or via microendoscopy.

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© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Sergey V. Plotnikov ; Anne M. Kenny ; Stephen J. Walsh ; Beata Zubrowski ; Cherian Joseph, et al.
"Measurement of muscle disease by quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging", J. Biomed. Opt. 13(4), 044018 (August 20, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2967536


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