Research Papers

Monitoring angiogenesis noninvasively with near-infrared spectroscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Jeffrey F. Dunn

University of Calgary, Experimental Imaging CentreandHotchkiss Brain InstituteandDepartment of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 Canada

Qiong Zhang

University of Calgary, Experimental Imaging CentreandDepartment of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 Canada

Ying Wu, Sathyanarayanan Srinivasan

University of Calgary, Experimental Imaging Centre andHotchkiss Brain Institute andDepartment of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 Canada

Michael R. Smith

University of Calgary,Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 Canada

R. Anthony Shaw

NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics, Spectroscopy, Room 371, 435 Ellice Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3B 1Y6 Canada

J. Biomed. Opt. 13(6), 064043 (December 03, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.3000431
History: Received June 23, 2008; Revised September 02, 2008; Accepted September 06, 2008; Published December 03, 2008
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Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is used to quantify cerebral blood volume (CBV) as a marker of angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels). Rats are exposed to chronic hypoxia for 3weeks at half atmospheric pressure to stimulate angiogenesis, and second-differential NIR spectroscopy is used to quantify total cerebral hemoglobin before and after angiogenesis. The cerebral hemoglobin (from broadband NIR spectroscopy), and the large vessel hemoglobin and hematocrit (from blood samples), are used to derive values for the calculation of CBV. The total hemoglobin in brain is 46.6±1.9μmoll (mean±SD, n=5) preacclimation and increases by 72% postacclimation. CBV is initially 3.26±0.41% v/v and increases by 31% with acclimation. Each individual animal shows a measureable increase in CBV. This study indicates that NIR broadband spectroscopy can be used for repeated measurements of CBV and can be applied as a noninvasive method to study angiogenesis.

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© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jeffrey F. Dunn ; Qiong Zhang ; Ying Wu ; Sathyanarayanan Srinivasan ; Michael R. Smith, et al.
"Monitoring angiogenesis noninvasively with near-infrared spectroscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 13(6), 064043 (December 03, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3000431


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