Research Papers

Fluorescence spectroscopy of oral tissue: Monte Carlo modeling with site-specific tissue properties

[+] Author Affiliations
Ina Pavlova

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, Texas 78712

Crystal Redden Weber

Rice University, Department of Chemistry, Houston, Texas 77005

Richard A. Schwarz

Rice University, Department of Bioengineering, Houston, Texas 77005

Michelle D. Williams

The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, Houston, Texas 77030

Ann M. Gillenwater

The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Houston, Texas 77030

Rebecca Richards-Kortum

Rice University, Department of Bioengineering, Houston, Texas 77030

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(1), 014009 (January 20, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3065544
History: Received July 04, 2008; Revised November 18, 2008; Accepted November 19, 2008; Published January 20, 2009
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A Monte Carlo model with site-specific input is used to predict depth-resolved fluorescence spectra from individual normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic oral sites. Our goal in developing this model is to provide a computational tool to study how the morphological characteristics of the tissue affect clinically measured spectra. Tissue samples from the measured sites are imaged using fluorescence confocal microscopy; autofluorescence patterns are measured as a function of depth and tissue sublayer for each individual site. These fluorescence distributions are used as input to the Monte Carlo model to generate predictions of fluorescence spectra, which are compared to clinically measured spectra on a site-by-site basis. A lower fluorescence intensity and longer peak emission wavelength observed in clinical spectra from dysplastic and cancerous sites are found to be associated with a decrease in measured fluorescence originating from the stroma or deeper fibrous regions, and an increase in the measured fraction of photons originating from the epithelium or superficial tissue layers. The simulation approach described here can be used to suggest an optical probe design that samples fluorescence at a depth that gives optimal separation in the spectral signal measured for benign, dysplastic, and cancerous oral mucosa.

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© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Ina Pavlova ; Crystal Redden Weber ; Richard A. Schwarz ; Michelle D. Williams ; Ann M. Gillenwater, et al.
"Fluorescence spectroscopy of oral tissue: Monte Carlo modeling with site-specific tissue properties", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(1), 014009 (January 20, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3065544


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