Research Papers

Compact portable ocular microtremor sensor: design, development and calibration

[+] Author Affiliations
James P. Ryle

University College Dublin, School of Electronic, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering and Optoelectronics Research Centre and SFI Strategic Research Centre in Solar Energy Conversion, Belfield, Dublin 4, Republic of Ireland

Mohammed Al-Kalbani, Niamh Collins

St. James’s Hospital, Mercer’s Institute for Research on Ageing and Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department, Dublin, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland

Unnikrishnan Gopinathan

University College Dublin, School of Electronic, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Belfield, Dublin 4, Republic of Ireland

Gerard Boyle, Davis Coakley

St. James’s Hospital, Mercer’s Institute for Research on Ageing and Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department, Dublin, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland

John T. Sheridan

University College Dublin, School of Electronic, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering and, Optoelectronics Research Centre and SFI Strategic Research Centre in Solar Energy Conversion, Belfield, Dublin 4, Republic of Ireland

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(1), 014021 (February 25, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3083435
History: Received September 30, 2008; Revised December 22, 2008; Accepted December 23, 2008; Published February 25, 2009
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Ocular microtremor (OMT) is a physiological high-frequency (up to 150Hz) low-amplitude (252500nm peak-to-peak) involuntary motion of the human eye. Recent studies suggest a number of clinical applications for OMT that include monitoring the depth of anesthesia of a patient in surgery, prediction of outcome in coma, and diagnosis of brain stem death. Clinical OMT investigations to date have used mechanical piezoelectric probes or piezoelectric strain gauges that have many drawbacks which arise from the fact that the probe is in contact with the eye. We describe the design of a compact noncontact sensing device to measure OMT that addresses some of the above drawbacks. We evaluate the system performance using a calibrated piezoelectric vibrator that simulates OMT signals under conditions that can occur in practice, i.e., wet eye conditions. We also test the device at low light levels well within the eye safety range.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

James P. Ryle ; Mohammed Al-Kalbani ; Niamh Collins ; Unnikrishnan Gopinathan ; Gerard Boyle, et al.
"Compact portable ocular microtremor sensor: design, development and calibration", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(1), 014021 (February 25, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3083435


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