Research Papers

In vivo time-resolved spectroscopy of the human bronchial early cancer autofluorescence

[+] Author Affiliations
Pascal Uehlinger, Tanja Gabrecht, Thomas Glanzmann, Jean-Pierre Ballini

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Station 6, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Alexandre Radu

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois Lausanne, Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Hospices-CHUV, CH-1011 Lausanne, Switzerland

Snezana Andrejevic

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois Lausanne, Institute of Pathology, Rue du Bugnon 27, Hospices-CHUV, CH-1011 Lausanne, Switzerland

Philippe Monnier

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois Lausanne, Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Hospices-CHUV, CH-1011 Lausanne, Switzerland

Georges Wagnières

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Station 6, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(2), 024011 (March 19, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3088100
History: Received September 12, 2008; Revised January 06, 2009; Accepted January 13, 2009; Published March 19, 2009
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Time-resolved measurements of tissue autofluorescence (AF) excited at 405nm were carried out with an optical-fiber-based spectrometer in the bronchi of 11 patients. The objectives consisted of assessing the lifetime as a new tumor/normal (T/N) tissue contrast parameter and trying to explain the origin of the contrasts observed when using AF-based cancer detection imaging systems. No significant change in the AF lifetimes was found. AF bronchoscopy performed in parallel with an imaging device revealed both intensity and spectral contrasts. Our results suggest that the spectral contrast might be due to an enhanced blood concentration just below the epithelial layers of the lesion. The intensity contrast probably results from the thickening of the epithelium in the lesions. The absence of T/N lifetime contrast indicates that the quenching is not at the origin of the fluorescence intensity and spectral contrasts. These lifetimes (6.9ns, 2.0ns, and 0.2ns) were consistent for all the examined sites. The fact that these lifetimes are the same for different emission domains ranging between 430 and 680nm indicates that there is probably only one dominant fluorophore involved. The measured lifetimes suggest that this fluorophore is elastin.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Pascal Uehlinger ; Tanja Gabrecht ; Thomas Glanzmann ; Jean-Pierre Ballini ; Alexandre Radu, et al.
"In vivo time-resolved spectroscopy of the human bronchial early cancer autofluorescence", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(2), 024011 (March 19, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3088100


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