Research Papers

Near-infrared narrow-band imaging of gold/silica nanoshells in tumors

[+] Author Affiliations
Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan, Jaesook Park

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1 University Station C0800, Austin, Texas 78712

Parmeswaran Diagaradjane

Radiation Oncology-Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard Unit-66, Houston, Texas 77030

Jon A. Schwartz, Chris L. Coleman, Kelly L. Gill-Sharp, Kristina L. Sang, J. Donald Payne

Nanospectra Biosciences, Inc., 8285 El Rio Street, Suite 150, Houston, Texas 77054

Sunil Krishnan

Radiation Oncology-Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit-66, Houston, Texas 77030

James W. Tunnell

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1 University Station C0800, Austin, Texas 78712

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(2), 024044 (April 22, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3120494
History: Received December 15, 2008; Revised February 18, 2009; Accepted February 24, 2009; Published April 22, 2009
Text Size: A A A

Gold nanoshells (GNS) are a new class of nanoparticles that can be optically tuned to scatter or absorb light from the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared (NIR) region by varying the core (dielectric silica)/shell (gold) ratio. In addition to spectral tunability, GNS are inert and bioconjugatable, making them potential labels for in vivo imaging and therapy of tumors. We report the use of GNS as exogenous contrast agents for enhanced visualization of tumors using narrow-band imaging (NBI). NBI takes advantage of the strong NIR absorption of GNS to distinguish between blood and nanoshells in the tumor by imaging in narrow wavelength bands in the visible and NIR, respectively. Using tissue-simulating phantoms, we determined the optimum wavelengths to enhance contrast between blood and GNS. We then used the optimum wavelengths for ex vivo imaging of tumors extracted from human colon cancer xenograft bearing mice injected with GNS. Systemically delivered GNS accumulated passively in tumor xenografts by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Ex vivo NBI of tumor xenografts demonstrated heterogeneous distribution of GNS with a clear distinction from the tumor vasculature. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using GNS as contrast agents to visualize tumors using NBI.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan ; Jaesook Park ; Parmeswaran Diagaradjane ; Jon A. Schwartz ; Chris L. Coleman, et al.
"Near-infrared narrow-band imaging of gold/silica nanoshells in tumors", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(2), 024044 (April 22, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3120494


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.