Research Papers

Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury

[+] Author Affiliations
Chao Zhou

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Stephanie A. Eucker

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Bioengineering, 3451 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Turgut Durduran

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Radiology, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and ICFO–Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Castelldefels (Barcelona), Spain 08860

Guoqiang Yu

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and University of Kentucky, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Wenner-Gren Research Laboratory, Lexington, Kentucky 40506

Jill Ralston, Stuart H. Friess

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Bioengineering, 3451 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Rebecca N. Ichord

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Division of Neurology, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Susan S. Margulies

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Bioengineering, 3451 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Arjun G. Yodh

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 09104

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(3), 034015 (June 04, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3146814
History: Received February 18, 2009; Accepted March 25, 2009; Published June 04, 2009
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We used a nonimpact inertial rotational model of a closed head injury in neonatal piglets to simulate the conditions following traumatic brain injury in infants. Diffuse optical techniques, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), were used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation and blood flow continuously and noninvasively before injury and up to 6h after the injury. The DCS measurements of relative cerebral blood flow were validated against the fluorescent microsphere method. A strong linear correlation was observed between the two techniques (R=0.89, p<0.00001). Injury-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes were quantified, and significant changes were found in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation, and cerebral blood flow after the injury. The diffuse optical measurements were robust and also correlated well with recordings of vital physiological parameters over the 6-h monitoring period, such as mean arterial blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, and heart rate. Finally, the diffuse optical techniques demonstrated sensitivity to dynamic physiological events, such as apnea, cardiac arrest, and hypertonic saline infusion. In total, the investigation corraborates potential of the optical methods for bedside monitoring of pediatric and adult human patients in the neurointensive care unit.

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© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Chao Zhou ; Stephanie A. Eucker ; Turgut Durduran ; Guoqiang Yu ; Jill Ralston, et al.
"Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(3), 034015 (June 04, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3146814


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