Research Papers

Feasibility of digitally stained multimodal confocal mosaics to simulate histopathology

[+] Author Affiliations
Daniel S. Gareau

Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Dermatology Service, 160 East 53rd Street, New York, New York 10022 and Oregon Health & Science University, Departments of Dermatology and Biomedical Engineering, 3303 S.W. Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(3), 034050 (June 30, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3149853
History: Received February 11, 2009; Revised April 16, 2009; Accepted April 21, 2009; Published June 30, 2009
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Fluorescence confocal mosaicing microscopy of tissue biopsies stained with acridine orange has been shown to accurately identify tumors and with an overall sensitivity of 96.6% and specificity of 89.2%. However, fluorescence shows only nuclear detail similar to hematoxylin in histopathology and does not show collagen or cytoplasm, which may provide necessary negative contrast information similar to eosin used in histopathology. Reflectance mode contrast is sensitive to collagen and cytoplasm without staining. To further improve sensitivity and specificity, digitally stained confocal mosaics combine confocal fluorescence and reflectance images in a multimodal pseudo-color image to mimic the appearance of histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin and facilitate the introduction of confocal microscopy into the clinical realm.

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© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Daniel S. Gareau
"Feasibility of digitally stained multimodal confocal mosaics to simulate histopathology", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(3), 034050 (June 30, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3149853


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