Research Papers

Use of an endoscope-compatible probe to detect colonic dysplasia with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Mark A. Mackanos

Stanford Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, E-150 Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305

John Hargrove, Rolf Wolters

STI Medical Systems, 733 Bishop Street, Suite 3100, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813

Christine B. Du, Shai Friedland, Roy M. Soetikno

VA Palo Alto Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Ave., Bldg. 100, Palo Alto, California 94304

Christopher H. Contag

Stanford Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, E–150 Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305

May R. Arroyo

University of Florida, College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, P. O. Box 100275, Gainesville, Florida 32610

James M. Crawford

North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Core Laboratory, 10 Nevada Drive, Lake Success, New York 11042–1114

Thomas D. Wang

University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Gastroenterology, 109 Zina Pitcher Place BSRB 1522, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044006 (July 15, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3174387
History: Received November 21, 2008; Revised May 05, 2009; Accepted May 20, 2009; Published July 15, 2009
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Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is sensitive to the molecular composition of tissue and has the potential to identify premalignant tissue (dysplasia) as an adjunct to endoscopy. We demonstrate collection of mid-infrared absorption spectra with a silver halide (AgCl0.4Br0.6) optical fiber and use spectral preprocessing to identify optimal subranges that classify colonic mucosa as normal, hyperplasia, or dysplasia. We collected spectra (n=83) in the 950to1800cm1 regime on biopsy specimens obtained from human subjects (n=37). Subtle differences in the magnitude of the absorbance peaks at specific wave numbers were observed. The best double binary algorithm for distinguishing normal-versus-dysplasia and hyperplasia-versus-dysplasia was determined from an exhaustive search of spectral intervals and preprocessing techniques. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to classify the spectra using a leave-one-subject–out cross-validation strategy. The results were compared with histology reviewed independently by two gastrointestinal pathologists. The optimal thresholds identified resulted in an overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value of 96%, 92%, 93%, and 82%, respectively. These results indicated that mid-infrared absorption spectra collected remotely with an optical fiber can be used to identify colonic dysplasia with high accuracy, suggesting that continued development of this technique for the early detection of cancer is promising.

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© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Mark A. Mackanos ; John Hargrove ; Rolf Wolters ; Christine B. Du ; Shai Friedland, et al.
"Use of an endoscope-compatible probe to detect colonic dysplasia with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044006 (July 15, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3174387


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