0
Research Papers

Laser-induced disruption of systemically administered liposomes for targeted drug delivery

[+] Author Affiliations
Mark A. Mackanos

Stanford Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, E-150 Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305

Malika Larabi

Stanford Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Lucas MRSI Center, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305

Rajesh Shinde

Stanford Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, E-150 Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305

Dmitrii M. Simanovskii

Stanford University, Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305

Samira Guccione

Stanford Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, and Department of Radiology, Stanford, California 94305

Christopher H. Contag

Stanford Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, and Department of Radiology, Lucas MRSI Center, Stanford, California 94305 and Stanford University, Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford, California 94305

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044009 (July 15, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3174410
History: Received October 08, 2008; Revised May 18, 2009; Accepted May 22, 2009; Published July 15, 2009
Text Size: A A A

Liposomal formulations of drugs have been shown to enhance drug efficacy by prolonging circulation time, increasing local concentration and reducing off-target effects. Controlled release from these formulations would increase their utility, and hyperthermia has been explored as a stimulus for targeted delivery of encapsulated drugs. Use of lasers as a thermal source could provide improved control over the release of the drug from the liposomes with minimal collateral tissue damage. Appropriate methods for assessing local release after systemic delivery would aid in testing and development of better formulations. We use in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of luciferin, used as a model small molecule, and demonstrate laser-induced release from liposomes in animal models after systemic delivery. These liposomes were tested for luciferin release between 37 and 45°C in PBS and serum using bioluminescence measurements. In vivo studies were performed on transgenic reporter mice that express luciferase constitutively throughout the body, thus providing a noninvasive readout for controlled release following systemic delivery. An Nd:YLF laser was used (527nm) to heat tissues and induce rupture of the intravenously delivered liposomes in target tissues. These data demonstrate laser-mediated control of small molecule delivery using thermally sensitive liposomal formulations.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Mark A. Mackanos ; Malika Larabi ; Rajesh Shinde ; Dmitrii M. Simanovskii ; Samira Guccione, et al.
"Laser-induced disruption of systemically administered liposomes for targeted drug delivery", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044009 (July 15, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3174410


Access This Article
Sign In to Access Full Content
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
 
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content

Tables

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement

Buy this article ($18 for members, $25 for non-members).
Sign In