Research Papers

Elastic scattering spectroscopy for detection of cancer risk in Barrett’s esophagus: experimental and clinical validation of error removal by orthogonal subtraction for increasing accuracy

[+] Author Affiliations
Ying Zhu

University College London, National Medical Laser Centre, Academic Division of Surgery Specialties, Charles Bell House, 67-73 Riding House Street, London W1W 7EJ, United Kingdom and University College London, Department of Statistical Science, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom

Tom Fearn

University College London, Department of Statistical Science, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom

Gary Mackenzie, Ben Clark, Jason M. Dunn

University College London, National Medical Laser Centre, 67-73 Riding House Street, London, W1W 7EJ, United Kingdom

Irving J. Bigio

Boston University, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Stephen G. Bown, Laurence B. Lovat

University College London, National Medical Laser Centre, 67-73 Riding House Street, London, W1W 7EJ, United Kingdom

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044022 (August 11, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3194291
History: Received March 25, 2009; Revised June 03, 2009; Accepted June 05, 2009; Published August 11, 2009
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Elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) may be used to detect high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer in Barrett’s esophagus (BE). When spectra are measured in vivo by a hand-held optical probe, variability among replicated spectra from the same site can hinder the development of a diagnostic model for cancer risk. An experiment was carried out on excised tissue to investigate how two potential sources of this variability, pressure and angle, influence spectral variability, and the results were compared with the variations observed in spectra collected in vivo from patients with Barrett’s esophagus. A statistical method called error removal by orthogonal subtraction (EROS) was applied to model and remove this measurement variability, which accounted for 96.6% of the variation in the spectra, from the in vivo data. Its removal allowed the construction of a diagnostic model with specificity improved from 67% to 82% (with sensitivity fixed at 90%). The improvement was maintained in predictions on an independent in vivo data set. EROS works well as an effective pretreatment for Barrett’s in vivo data by identifying measurement variability and ameliorating its effect. The procedure reduces the complexity and increases the accuracy and interpretability of the model for classification and detection of cancer risk in Barrett’s esophagus.

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© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Ying Zhu ; Tom Fearn ; Gary Mackenzie ; Ben Clark ; Jason M. Dunn, et al.
"Elastic scattering spectroscopy for detection of cancer risk in Barrett’s esophagus: experimental and clinical validation of error removal by orthogonal subtraction for increasing accuracy", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044022 (August 11, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3194291


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