Research Papers

Three-dimensional cardiac architecture determined by two-photon microtomy

[+] Author Affiliations
Hayden Huang

Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Columbia University, 351 Engineering Terrace, 1210 Amsterdam Avenue, MC 8904, New York, New York 10027

Catherine MacGillivray

Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Hyuk-Sang Kwon

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 500 Technology Square, NE47-276, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Department of Mechatronics and Graduate Program of Medical System Engineering, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500–712, Korea

Jan Lammerding

Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Jeffrey Robbins

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229

Richard T. Lee

Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Peter So

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 500 Technology Square, NE47-276, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044029 (August 20, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3200939
History: Received March 27, 2009; Revised June 11, 2009; Accepted June 17, 2009; Published August 20, 2009
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Cardiac architecture is inherently three-dimensional, yet most characterizations rely on two-dimensional histological slices or dissociated cells, which remove the native geometry of the heart. We previously developed a method for labeling intact heart sections without dissociation and imaging large volumes while preserving their three-dimensional structure. We further refine this method to permit quantitative analysis of imaged sections. After data acquisition, these sections are assembled using image-processing tools, and qualitative and quantitative information is extracted. By examining the reconstructed cardiac blocks, one can observe end-to-end adjacent cardiac myocytes (cardiac strands) changing cross-sectional geometries, merging and separating from other strands. Quantitatively, representative cross-sectional areas typically used for determining hypertrophy omit the three-dimensional component; we show that taking orientation into account can significantly alter the analysis. Using fast-Fourier transform analysis, we analyze the gross organization of cardiac strands in three dimensions. By characterizing cardiac structure in three dimensions, we are able to determine that the α crystallin mutation leads to hypertrophy with cross-sectional area increases, but not necessarily via changes in fiber orientation distribution.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Heart ; Photons

Citation

Hayden Huang ; Catherine MacGillivray ; Hyuk-Sang Kwon ; Jan Lammerding ; Jeffrey Robbins, et al.
"Three-dimensional cardiac architecture determined by two-photon microtomy", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044029 (August 20, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3200939


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