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Research Papers

Sensitivity of neural-hemodynamic coupling to alterations in cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia

[+] Author Affiliations
Theodore J. Huppert

University of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 and Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129

Phill B. Jones

Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129

Anna Devor

Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and University of California San Diego, Department of Neurosciences, 9500 Gilman Drive 0662, La Jolla, California 92093

Andrew K. Dunn

University of Texas, Biomedical Engineering Department, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, Texas 78712

Ivan C. Teng

University of California San Diego, Neurosciences, 9500 Gilman Drive 0662, La Jolla, California 92093

Anders M. Dale

University of California, San Diego, Department of Neurosciences, 9500 Gilman Drive 0662, La Jolla, California 92093 and University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0657, La Jolla, California 92093

David A. Boas

Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044038 (August 31, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3210779
History: Received December 03, 2008; Revised June 29, 2009; Accepted June 30, 2009; Published August 31, 2009
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The relationship between measurements of cerebral blood oxygenation and neuronal activity is highly complex and depends on both neurovascular and neurometabolic biological coupling. While measurements of blood oxygenation changes via optical and MRI techniques have been developed to map functional brain activity, there is evidence that the specific characteristics of these signals are sensitive to the underlying vascular physiology and structure of the brain. Since baseline blood flow and oxygen saturation may vary between sessions and across subjects, functional blood oxygenation changes may be a less reliable indicator of brain activity in comparison to blood flow and metabolic changes. In this work, we use a biomechanical model to examine the relationships between neural, vascular, metabolic, and hemodynamic responses to parametric whisker stimulation under both normal and hypercapnic conditions in a rat model. We find that the relationship between neural activity and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin changes is sensitive to hypercapnia-induced changes in baseline cerebral blood flow. In contrast, the underlying relationships between evoked neural activity, blood flow, and model-estimated oxygen metabolism changes are unchanged by the hypercapnic challenge. We conclude that evoked changes in blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism are more closely associated with underlying evoked neuronal responses.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Theodore J. Huppert ; Phill B. Jones ; Anna Devor ; Andrew K. Dunn ; Ivan C. Teng, et al.
"Sensitivity of neural-hemodynamic coupling to alterations in cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(4), 044038 (August 31, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3210779


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