Research Papers

Risk assessment of the application of a plasma jet in dermatology

[+] Author Affiliations
Juergen Lademann, Heike Richter, Alena Alborova, Daniel Humme, Alexa Patzelt

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Center of Experimental and Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Charitéplatz 1, Berlin 10117, Germany

Axel Kramer

University of Greifswald, Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Domstrasse 11, Greifswald 17487, Germany

Klaus-Dieter Weltmann

Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Greifswald 17487, Germany

Bernd Hartmann, Christian Ottomann

Traumacenter Berlin (UKB), Burn Center, Warener Strasse 7, D-12683 Berlin, Germany

Joachim W. Fluhr

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Center of Experimental and Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Charitéplatz 1, Berlin 10117, Germany

Peter Hinz

University of Greifswald, Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Domstrasse 11, Greifswald 17487, Germany

Georg Hübner, Olaf Lademann

University of Greifswald, Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Greifswald, Germany

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(5), 054025 (October 14, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3247156
History: Received July 24, 2009; Accepted August 10, 2009; Published October 14, 2009
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Regardless of the fact that several highly efficient antiseptics are commercially available, the antiseptic treatment of chronic wounds remains a problem. In the past, electrical plasma discharges have been frequently used in biometrical science for disinfection and sterilization of material surfaces. Plasma systems usually have a temperature of several hundred degrees. Recently, it was reported that “cold” plasma can be applied onto living tissue. In in vitro studies on cell culture, it could be demonstrated that this new plasma possesses excellent antiseptic properties. We perform a risk assessment concerning the in vivo application of a “cold” plasma jet on patients and volunteers. Two potential risk factors, UV radiation and temperature, are evaluated. We show that the UV radiation of the plasma in the used system is an order of magnitude lower than the minimal erythema dose, necessary to produce sunburn on the skin in vivo. Additionally, thermal damage of the tissue by the plasma can be excluded. The results of the risk assessment stimulate the in vivo application of the investigated plasma jet in the treatment of chronic wounds.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Plasmas ; Tissues ; Skin

Citation

Juergen Lademann ; Heike Richter ; Alena Alborova ; Daniel Humme ; Alexa Patzelt, et al.
"Risk assessment of the application of a plasma jet in dermatology", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(5), 054025 (October 14, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3247156


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