Research Papers

Analysis of bacterial chemotactic response using dynamic laser speckle

[+] Author Affiliations
Silvia E. Murialdo

Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ingeniería, Departamento de Química, Grupo de Ingeniería Bioquímica, Juan B. Justo 4302, 7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina

Gonzalo H. Sendra

Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ingeniería, Laboratorio Láser, 7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina and Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC), Casilla de Correo No 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata, Argentina

Lucía I. Passoni

Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ingeniería, Laboratorio de Bioingeniería, Juan B. Justo 4302, 7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina

Ricardo Arizaga

Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC), UID Optimo, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de La Plata,Casilla de Correo No 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata, Argentina

J. Froilán Gonzalez

Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ingeniería, Departamento de Química, Grupo de Ingeniería Bioquímica, Juan B. Justo 4302, 7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina

Héctor Rabal, Marcelo Trivi

Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC), UID Optimo, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Casilla de Correo No 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata, Argentina

J. Biomed. Opt. 14(6), 064015 (November 19, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3262608
History: Received March 27, 2009; Revised September 17, 2009; Accepted September 19, 2009; Published November 19, 2009; Online November 19, 2009
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Chemotaxis has a meaningful role in several fields, such as microbial physiology, medicine and biotechnology. We present a new application of dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle) to detect different degrees of bacterial motility during chemotactic response experiments. Encouraging results showed different bacterial dynamic responses due to differences in the hardness of the support in the swarming plates. We compare this method to a conventional technique that uses white light. Both methods showed to be analogous and, in some cases, complementary. The results suggest that biospeckle processed images can be used as an alternative method to evaluate bacterial chemotactic response and can supply additional information about the bacterial motility in different areas of the swarm plate assay that might be useful for biological analysis.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Bacteria ; Lasers ; Speckle

Citation

Silvia E. Murialdo ; Gonzalo H. Sendra ; Lucía I. Passoni ; Ricardo Arizaga ; J. Froilán Gonzalez, et al.
"Analysis of bacterial chemotactic response using dynamic laser speckle", J. Biomed. Opt. 14(6), 064015 (November 19, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3262608


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