Special Section on Optical Methods in Vascular Biology and Medicine

Spectral imaging reveals microvessel physiology and function from anastomoses to thromboses

[+] Author Affiliations
Mamta Wankhede, Nikita Agarwal

University of Florida, College of Engineering, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, Gainesville, Florida 32611

Rodrigo A. Fraga-Silva

University of Florida, College of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, Gainesville, Florida 32611

Casey deDeugd

University of Florida, College of Engineering, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, Gainesville, Florida 32611

Mohan K. Raizada

University of Florida, College of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, Gainesville, Florida 32611

S. Paul Oh

University of Florida, College of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, Gainesville, Florida 32611 and University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, Gainesville, Florida 32611 and University of Medicine and Science, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon, Incheon, Korea

Brian S. Sorg

University of Florida, College of Engineering, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, P.O. Box 116131, Gainesville, Florida 32611

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(1), 011111 (February 19, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3316299
History: Received July 20, 2009; Revised December 15, 2009; Accepted December 15, 2009; Published February 19, 2010; Online February 19, 2010
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Abnormal microvascular physiology and function is common in many diseases. Numerous pathologies include hypervascularity, aberrant angiogenesis, or abnormal vascular remodeling among the characteristic features of the disease, and quantitative imaging and measurement of microvessel function can be important to increase understanding of these diseases. Several optical techniques are useful for direct imaging of microvascular function. Spectral imaging is one such technique that can be used to assess microvascular oxygen transport function with high spatial and temporal resolution in microvessel networks through measurements of hemoglobin saturation. We highlight novel observation made with our intravital microscopy spectral imaging system employed with mouse dorsal skin-fold window chambers for imaging hemoglobin saturation in microvessel networks. Specifically, we image acute oxygenation fluctuations in a tumor microvessel network, the development of arteriovenous malformations in a mouse model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and the formation of spontaneous and induced microvascular thromboses and occlusions.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Mamta Wankhede ; Nikita Agarwal ; Rodrigo A. Fraga-Silva ; Casey deDeugd ; Mohan K. Raizada, et al.
"Spectral imaging reveals microvessel physiology and function from anastomoses to thromboses", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(1), 011111 (February 19, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3316299


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