Special Section on Optical Methods in Vascular Biology and Medicine

Application of intravital microscopy in studies of tumor microcirculation

[+] Author Affiliations
Sarah Jane Lunt

University of Sheffield, School of Medicine, Tumour Microcirculation Group and Department of Oncology, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, United Kingdom

Colin Gray

University of Sheffield, School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Science, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, United Kingdom

Constantino Carlos Reyes-Aldasoro

University of Sheffield, School of Medicine, Tumour Microcirculation Group and Department of Oncology, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, United Kingdom

Stephen J. Matcher

University of Sheffield, The Kroto Institute, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ, United Kingdom

Gillian M. Tozer

University of Sheffield, School of Medicine, Tumour Microcirculation Group and Department of Oncology, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, United Kingdom

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(1), 011113 (February 09, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3281674
History: Received September 11, 2009; Revised October 20, 2009; Accepted October 22, 2009; Published February 09, 2010; Online February 09, 2010
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To grow and progress, solid tumors develop a vascular network through co-option and angiogenesis that is characterized by multiple structural and functional abnormalities, which negatively influence therapeutic outcome through direct and indirect mechanisms. As such, the morphology and function of tumor blood vessels, plus their response to different treatments, are a vital and active area of biological research. Intravital microscopy (IVM) has played a key role in studies of tumor angiogenesis, and ongoing developments in molecular probes, imaging techniques, and postimage analysis methods have ensured its continued and widespread use. In this review we discuss some of the primary advantages and disadvantages of IVM approaches and describe recent technological advances in optical microscopy (e.g., confocal microscopy, multiphoton microscopy, hyperspectral imaging, and optical coherence tomography) with examples of their application to studies of tumor angiogenesis.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Sarah Jane Lunt ; Colin Gray ; Constantino Carlos Reyes-Aldasoro ; Stephen J. Matcher and Gillian M. Tozer
"Application of intravital microscopy in studies of tumor microcirculation", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(1), 011113 (February 09, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3281674


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