Research Papers: General

Linking optics and mechanics in an in vivo model of airway fibrosis and epithelial injury

[+] Author Affiliations
Christopher B. Raub

University of California, Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Irvine, California 92697

Sari Mahon

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine, California 92697

Navneet Narula

University of California, Irvine, Department of Pathology, Irvine, California 92697

Bruce J. Tromberg

University of California, Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Surgery and Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine, California 92697

Matthew Brenner

University of California, Irvine, Department of Medicine, Irvine, California 92697

Steven C. George

University of California, Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Irvine, California 92697

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(1), 015004 (February 22, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3322296
History: Received June 23, 2009; Revised November 20, 2009; Accepted December 18, 2009; Published February 22, 2010; Online February 22, 2010
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Chronic mucosal and submucosal injury can lead to persistent inflammation and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that microstructural and mechanical properties of the airway wall could be derived from multiphoton images. New Zealand White rabbits were intubated, and the tracheal epithelium gently denuded every other day for five days (three injuries). Three days following the last injury, the tracheas were excised for multiphoton imaging, mechanical compression testing, and histological analysis. Multiphoton imaging and histology confirm epithelial denudation, mucosal ulceration, subepithelial thickening, collagen deposition, immune cell infiltration, and a disrupted elastin network. Elastase removes the elastin network and relaxes the collagen network. Purified collagenase removes epithelium with subtle subepithelial changes. Young’s modulus [(E) measured in kiloPascal] was significantly elevated for the scrape injured (9.0±3.2) trachea, and both collagenase (2.6±0.4) and elastase (0.8±0.3) treatment significantly reduced E relative to control (4.1±0.7). E correlates strongly with second harmonic generation (SHG) signal depth decay for enzyme-treated and control tracheas (R2=0.77), but not with scrape-injured tracheas. We conclude that E of subepithelial connective tissue increases on repeated epithelial wounding, due in part to changes in elastin and collagen microstructure and concentration. SHG depth decay is sensitive to changes in extracellular matrix content and correlates with bulk Young’s modulus.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Christopher B. Raub ; Sari Mahon ; Navneet Narula ; Bruce J. Tromberg ; Matthew Brenner, et al.
"Linking optics and mechanics in an in vivo model of airway fibrosis and epithelial injury", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(1), 015004 (February 22, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3322296


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