Research Papers: Imaging

Scanning laser image correlation for measurement of flow

[+] Author Affiliations
Molly J. Rossow

University of California, Irvine, Biomedical Engineering Department, 3120 Natural Sciences 2, Irvine, California 92697-2715

William W. Mantulin

University of California, Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612

Enrico Gratton

University of California, Irvine, Biomedical Engineering Department, 3120 Natural Sciences 2, Irvine, California 92697-2715

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(2), 026003 (April 20, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3365946
History: Received July 03, 2009; Revised January 06, 2010; Accepted January 15, 2010; Published April 20, 2010; Online April 20, 2010
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Scanning laser image correlation (SLIC) is an optical correlation technique for measuring the fluid velocity of particles suspended in a liquid. This technique combines laser scanning of an arbitrary pattern with pair cross-correlation between any two points in the pattern. SLIC overcomes many of the limitations of other optical correlation techniques for flow measurement, such as laser speckle, spatial temporal image correlation spectroscopy, and two-foci methods. One of the main advantages of SLIC is that the concept can be applied to measurements on a range of scales through simple zooming or modifications in the instrumentation. Additionally, SLIC is relatively insensitive to instrument noise through the use of correlation analysis and is insensitive to background. SLIC can provide detailed information about the direction and pattern of flow. SLIC has potential applications ranging from microfluidics to blood flow measurements.

Figures in this Article
KDS100, KD Scientific, Holliston, Massachusetts

Citation

Molly J. Rossow ; William W. Mantulin and Enrico Gratton
"Scanning laser image correlation for measurement of flow", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(2), 026003 (April 20, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3365946


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