Research Papers: Imaging

Digital holographic microscopy real-time monitoring of cytoarchitectural alterations during simulated microgravity

[+] Author Affiliations
Christophe Pache

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Advanced Photonics Laboratory, Lausanne, 1015 Switzerland and Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Space Biology Group, Zürich, 8005 Switzerland

Jonas Kühn

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Advanced Photonics Laboratory, Lausanne, 1015 Switzerland and University Hospital of Vaud, DP-CHUV, Prilly s/Lausanne, 1008 Switzerland

Kriss Westphal

Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Space Biology Group, Zürich, 8005 Switzerland

M. Fatih Toy, Jérôme Parent

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Advanced Photonics Laboratory, Lausanne, 1015 Switzerland

Oralea Büchi, Alfredo Franco-Obregón

Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Mechanobiology Laboratory, Zürich, 8005 Switzerland

Christian Depeursinge

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Advanced Photonics Laboratory, Lausanne, 1015 Switzerland

Marcel Egli

Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Space Biology Group, Zürich, 8005 Switzerland

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(2), 026021 (April 06, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3377960
History: Received December 18, 2009; Revised February 25, 2010; Accepted February 26, 2010; Published April 06, 2010
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Previous investigations on mammalian cells have shown that microgravity, either that experienced in space, or simulated on earth, causes severe cellular modifications that compromise tissue determination and function. The aim of this study is to investigate, in real time, the morphological changes undergone by cells experiencing simulated microgravity by using digital holographic microscopy (DHM). DHM analysis of living mouse myoblasts (C2C12) is undertaken under simulated microgravity with a random positioning machine. The DHM analysis reveals cytoskeletal alterations similar to those previously reported with conventional methods, and in agreement with conventional brightfield fluorescence microscopy a posteriori investigation. Indeed, DHM is shown to be able to noninvasively and quantitatively detect changes in actin reticular formation, as well as actin distribution, in living unstained samples. Such results were previously only obtainable with the use of labeled probes in conjunction with conventional fluorescence microscopy, with all the classically described limitations in terms of bias, bleaching, and temporal resolution.

Figures in this Article
Basler A101f, Basler Vision Technologies, Ahrensburg, Germany

Citation

Christophe Pache ; Jonas Kühn ; Kriss Westphal ; M. Fatih Toy ; Jérôme Parent, et al.
"Digital holographic microscopy real-time monitoring of cytoarchitectural alterations during simulated microgravity", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(2), 026021 (April 06, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3377960


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