Research Papers: Imaging

Inspired gas-induced vascular change in tumors with magnetic-resonance-guided near-infrared imaging: human breast pilot study

[+] Author Affiliations
Colin M. Carpenter

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

Rebecca Rakow-Penner

Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, California 94305

Shudong Jiang

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

Bruce L. Daniel

Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, California 94305

Brian W. Pogue

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

Gary H. Glover

Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, California 94305

Keith D. Paulsen

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(3), 036026 (May 26, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3430729
History: Received November 01, 2009; Revised March 24, 2010; Accepted April 21, 2010; Published May 26, 2010; Online May 26, 2010
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This study investigates differences in the response of breast tumor tissue versus healthy fibroglandular tissue to inspired gases. Cycles of carbogen and oxygen gas are administered while measuring the changes with magnetic-resonance-guided near-infrared imaging in a pilot study of breast cancers. For two patients, analyses are performed with cross-correlation techniques, which measure the strength of hemodynamic modulation. The results show that the overall vasoresponse, indicated by total hemoglobin, of healthy tissue has approximately a 72% and 41% greater correlation to the gas stimulus than the tumor region, in two patients respectively, when background physiological changes are controlled. These data support the hypothesis that tumor vasculature has a poorly functioning vasodilatory mechanism, most likely caused by dysfunctional smooth muscle cells lining the vasculature. This study presents a methodology to quantitatively analyze inspired gas changes in human breast tumors, and demonstrates this technique in a pilot patient population.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Colin M. Carpenter ; Rebecca Rakow-Penner ; Shudong Jiang ; Bruce L. Daniel ; Brian W. Pogue, et al.
"Inspired gas-induced vascular change in tumors with magnetic-resonance-guided near-infrared imaging: human breast pilot study", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(3), 036026 (May 26, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3430729


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