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Research Papers: General

Modeling light propagation through bacterial colonies and its correlation with forward scattering patterns

[+] Author Affiliations
Euiwon Bae, Nan Bai

Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

Amornrat Aroonnual

Purdue University, Department of Food Science, Molecular Food Microbiology Laboratory, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

J. Paul Robinson

Purdue University, Department of Basic Medical Science and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

Arun K. Bhunia

Purdue University, Department of Food Science, Molecular Food Microbiology Laboratory, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

E. Daniel Hirleman

Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(4), 045001 (July 16, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3463003
History: Received February 02, 2010; Revised May 07, 2010; Accepted May 12, 2010; Published July 16, 2010; Online July 16, 2010
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Bacterial colonies play an important role in the isolation and identification of bacterial species, and plating on a petri dish is still regarded as the gold standard for confirming the cause of an outbreak situation. A bacterial colony consists of millions of densely packed individual bacteria along with matrices such as extracellular materials. When a laser is directed through a colony, complicated structures encode their characteristic signatures, which results in unique forward scattering patterns. We investigate the connection between the morphological parameters of a bacterial colony and corresponding forward scattering patterns to understand bacterial growth morphology. A colony elevation is modeled with a Gaussian profile, which is defined with two critical parameters: center thickness and diameter. Then, applying the scalar diffraction theory, we compute an amplitude modulation via light attenuation from multiple layers of bacteria while a phase modulation is computed from the colony profile. Computational results indicate that center thickness plays a critical role in the total number of diffraction rings while the magnitude of the slope of a colony determines the maximum diffraction angle. Experimental validation is performed by capturing the scattering patterns, monitoring colony diameters via phase contrast microscope, and acquiring the colony profiles via confocal displacement meter.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Euiwon Bae ; Nan Bai ; Amornrat Aroonnual ; J. Paul Robinson ; Arun K. Bhunia, et al.
"Modeling light propagation through bacterial colonies and its correlation with forward scattering patterns", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(4), 045001 (July 16, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3463003


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