Research Papers: Imaging

Comparison of optical coherence tomography, microcomputed tomography, and histology at a three-dimensionally imaged trabecular bone sample

[+] Author Affiliations
Christoph Kasseck

Ruhr-University Bochum, Photonics and Terahertz Technology, Universitaetsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum, Germany

Marita Kratz

Philipps University, Marburg, Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg, Germany

Antonia Torcasio

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Division of Biomechanics and Engineering Design, Celestijnenlaan 300c, 3001 Leuven, Belgium

Nils C. Gerhardt

Ruhr-University Bochum, Photonics and Terahertz Technology, Universitaetsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum, Germany

G. Harry van Lenthe

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Division of Biomechanics and Engineering Design, Celestijnenlaan 300c, 3001 Leuven, Belgium

Thilo Gambichler, Klaus Hoffmann

St. Josef Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Gudrunstrasse 56, 44791 Bochum, Germany

David B. Jones

Philipps University, Marburg, Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg, Germany

Martin R. Hofmann

Ruhr-University Bochum, Photonics and Terahertz Technology, Universitaetsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum, Germany

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(4), 046019 (August 16, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3477193
History: Received February 10, 2010; Revised May 05, 2010; Accepted June 17, 2010; Published August 16, 2010; Online August 16, 2010
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We investigate optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a method for imaging bone. The OCT images are compared directly to those of the standard methods of bone histology and microcomputed tomography (μCT) on a single, fixed human femoral trabecular bone sample. An advantage of OCT over bone histology is its noninvasive nature. OCT also images the lamellar structure of trabeculae at slightly higher contrast than normal bone histology. While μCT visualizes the trabecular framework of the whole sample, OCT can image additionally cells with a penetration depth limited approximately to 1mm. The most significant advantage of OCT, however, is the absence of toxic effects (no ionizing radiation), i.e., continuous images may be made and individual cell tracking may be performed. The penetration depth of OCT, however, limits its use to small animal models and small bone organ cultures.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Christoph Kasseck ; Marita Kratz ; Antonia Torcasio ; Nils C. Gerhardt ; G. Harry van Lenthe, et al.
"Comparison of optical coherence tomography, microcomputed tomography, and histology at a three-dimensionally imaged trabecular bone sample", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(4), 046019 (August 16, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3477193


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