Special Section on Optical Diagnostic and Biophotonic Methods from Bench to Bedside

Image guided near-infrared spectroscopy of breast tissue in vivo using boundary element method

[+] Author Affiliations
Subhadra Srinivasan

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

Colin M. Carpenter

Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, California 94305

Hamid R. Ghadyani

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

Senate J. Taka

Dartmouth College, Department of Computer Science, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

Peter A. Kaufman

Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Department of Hematology/Oncology, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756

Roberta M. DiFlorio-Alexander

Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Department of Radiology, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756

Wendy A. Wells

Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Department of Pathology, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756

Brian W. Pogue, Keith D. Paulsen

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

J. Biomed. Opt. 15(6), 061703 (December 17, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3499419
History: Received February 01, 2010; Revised May 27, 2010; Accepted May 28, 2010; Published December 17, 2010; Online December 17, 2010
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We demonstrate quantitative functional imaging using image-guided near-infrared spectroscopy (IG-NIRS) implemented with the boundary element method (BEM) for reconstructing 3-D optical property estimates in breast tissue in vivo. A multimodality MRI-NIR system was used to collect measurements of light reflectance from breast tissue. The BEM was used to model light propagation in 3-D based only on surface discretization in order to reconstruct quantitative values of total hemoglobin (HbT), oxygen saturation, water, and scatter. The technique was validated in experimental measurements from heterogeneous breast-shaped phantoms with known values and applied to a total of seven subjects comprising six healthy individuals and one participant with cancer imaged at two time points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Using experimental measurements from a heterogeneous breast phantom, BEM for IG-NIRS produced accurate values for HbT in the inclusion with a <3% error. Healthy breast tissues showed higher HbT and water in fibroglandular tissue than in adipose tissue. In a subject with cancer, the tumor showed higher HbT compared to the background. HbT in the tumor was reduced by 9 μM during treatment. We conclude that 3-D MRI-NIRS with BEM provides quantitative and functional characterization of breast tissue in vivo through measurement of hemoglobin content. The method provides potentially complementary information to DCE-MRI for tumor characterization.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Subhadra Srinivasan ; Colin M. Carpenter ; Hamid R. Ghadyani ; Senate J. Taka ; Peter A. Kaufman, et al.
"Image guided near-infrared spectroscopy of breast tissue in vivo using boundary element method", J. Biomed. Opt. 15(6), 061703 (December 17, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3499419


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